Vaccines, Antibodies and Drug Libraries. The Possible COVID-19 Treatments Researchers Are Excited About

In early April, about four months after a new, highly infectious coronavirus was first identified in China, an international group of scientists reported encouraging results from a study of an experimental drug for treating the viral disease known as COVID-19. It was a small study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, but showed that remdesivir, an unapproved drug that was originally developed to fight Ebola, helped 68% of patients with severe breathing problems due to COVID-19 to improve; 60% of those who relied on a ventilator to breathe and took the drug were able to wean themselves off the machines after 18 days. Repurposing drugs designed to treat other diseases to now treat COVID-19 is one of the quickest ways to find a new therapy to control the current pandemic. Also in April, researchers at Vanderbilt University enrolled the first patients in a much-anticipated study of hydroxychloroquine. It’s already approved to treat malaria and certain autoimmune disorders like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus but hasn’t been studied, until now, against coronavirus. Yet the medication has become a sought-after COVID-19 treatment after first Chinese doctors, and then President Trump touted its potential in treating COVID-19. The data from China is promising but not conclusive, and infectious disease experts, including Trump’s coronavirus task force scientific advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci, aren’t convinced it’s ready for prime time yet in Ameri...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

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Publication date: September 2020Source: American Heart Journal, Volume 227Author(s): Payam Dehghani, Laura J. Davidson, Cindy L. Grines, Keshav Nayak, Jacqueline Saw, Prashant Kaul, Akshay Bagai, Ross Garberich, Christian Schmidt, Hung Q. Ly, Jay Giri, Perwaiz Meraj, Binita Shah, Santiago Garcia, Scott Sharkey, David A. Wood, Frederick G. Welt, Ehtisham Mahmud, Timothy D. Henry
Source: American Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake. The correct information is given below.
Source: Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake. Complete figure captions are missing.
Source: Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Authors: Robb CM, Kour S, Contreras JI, Agarwal E, Barger CJ, Rana S, Sonawane Y, Neilsen BK, Taylor M, Kizhake S, Thakare RN, Chowdhury S, Wang J, Black JD, Hollingsworth MA, Brattain MG, Natarajan A Abstract [This corrects the article DOI: 10.18632/oncotarget.23749.]. PMID: 32637035 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
Authors: Sarfstein R, Werner H Abstract A significant volume of clinical and epidemiological data provides support to the concept that insulin and the insulin receptor (INSR) have an important role in breast cancer. Tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated molecule in human cancer. The present study was aimed at evaluating the hypothesis that p53 governs the expression and activation of the INSR gene in breast cancer cells. In addition, the study was designed to investigate the mechanism of action of p53 in the context of INSR gene regulation. The availability of MCF7 breast cancer-derived cell lines wit...
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: New-onset AF and the other severe complications were not associated with poorer long-term survival following esophagectomy. In addition, administration of landiolol hydrochloride after esophagectomy did not contribute to prolonging the OS. PMID: 32637032 [PubMed]
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings confirmed a high frequency of KIT and NRAS mutations in SUM, as well as a low incidence of BRAF mutations. We reported novel KRAS, CTNNB1, TP53, ERBB2, and SMAD4 mutations in SUM. Our findings provide new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of SUM. PMID: 32637031 [PubMed]
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
Authors: Chae HD, Dutta R, Tiu B, Hoff FW, Accordi B, Serafin V, Youn M, Huang M, Sumarsono N, Davis KL, Lacayo NJ, Pigazzi M, Horton TM, Kornblau SM, Sakamoto KM Abstract The 90 kDa Ribosomal S6 Kinase (RSK) drives cell proliferation and survival in cancers, although its oncogenic mechanism has not been well characterized. Phosphorylated level of RSK (T573) was increased in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and associated with poor survival. To examine the role of RSK in AML, we analyzed apoptosis and the cell cycle profile following treatment with BI-D1870, a potent inhibitor of RSK. BI-D1870 treatment increa...
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
Source: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Source: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
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