Women over 50 can cut their risk of a stroke by taking up healthy habits, research suggests 

The key habits to adopt are daily exercise, consuming less junk food and alcohol, not smoking and shedding a few pounds if overweight.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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This study provides direct evidence for the contribution of gut microbiota to the cognitive decline during normal aging and suggests that restoring microbiota homeostasis in the elderly may improve cognitive function. On Nutraceutical Senolytics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/05/on-nutraceutical-senolytics/ Nutraceuticals are compounds derived from foods, usually plants. In principle one can find useful therapies in the natural world, taking the approach of identifying interesting molecules and refining them to a greater potency than naturally occurs in order to produce a usefully large therape...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: There is an implicit assumption that early detection of hypertension through screening can reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality, but this assumption has not been tested in rigorous research studies. High-quality evidence from RCTs or programmatic evidence from NRCTs on the effectiveness and costs or harms of different screening strategies for hypertension (mass, targeted, or opportunistic) to reduce hypertension-related morbidity and mortality is lacking. PMID: 32378196 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of liver disease in the United States, and is estimated to affect up to a quarter of adults in the world. It is defined by excess fat accumulating in the liver and usually occurs in people with obesity, high blood sugars (diabetes), abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels, or high blood pressure. These disorders often run together and as a group are called metabolic syndrome. The “non-alcoholic” part of “non-alcoholic fatty liver disease” is important to distinguish it from alcohol-related liver disease, which can also cause excess liver...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Digestive Disorders Source Type: blogs
The coronavirus pandemic has changed a lot about modern American life: how we work, socialize, and even how we eat. Dining out is a distant memory. But nutritionally, people weren’t exactly thriving in pre-pandemic America. “Before COVID-19 came along, it was increasingly clear that the diet quality and nutritional status of Americans was terrible,” says Dr. Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. More than 40% of U.S. adults are obese. After years of declines, heart disease death rates are on the rise again. So are rates of obesity-linked canc...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Obesity is a serious, chronic, treatable, and global disease epidemic. Over 98 million people currently have the disease of obesity, and in a recent New England Journal of Medicine article, Harvard researchers predicted that by 2030, 50% of the population in the United States will have the disease of obesity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is significantly associated with obesity. While many people with obesity do not have diabetes, most people with T2D have the disease of obesity. Excess adiposity (body fat storage), which is present in obesity, contributes to many chronic diseases beyond T2D. These include high blood pressure, he...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Health Heart Health Surgery Source Type: blogs
Abstract Hypertension is the leading cause of preventable mortality worldwide, contributing to over 9 million deaths per annum, predominantly owing to cardiovascular disease. The association of obesity, physical inactivity and alcohol with elevated blood pressure (BP) is firmly established. Weight loss or other dietary strategies, such as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, have been shown to be effective in lowering BP. Additionally, specific nutrients are recognised to contribute to BP, with higher sodium intake linked with an increased risk of hypertension, while potassium is associated wit...
Source: Biochimie - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Biochimie Source Type: research
A friend of mine takes a statin medication each day to lower his cholesterol. More than once I’ve heard him say “I ate too much! I’m going to have to take an extra pill.” Never mind that it doesn’t work that way — a single additional statin pill won’t make much difference to his cholesterol or his health. And never mind that you shouldn’t self-adjust the dose of your medications (talk to your doctor before making any changes in medication dosing). But my friend’s overindulging does bring up the question of whether starting medications for conditions like high blood pres...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs
Abstract Primary Prevention of Acute Stroke Abstract. Strokes are frequent. Vascular risk factors are increasing the stroke risk. Most vascular risk factors are treatable. Their therapy is important in the primary prevention of stroke. According to the INTERSTROKE study, arterial hypertension, inactivity, overweight, dyslipidemia, smoking, unhealthy diet, cardiac pathologies such as major arrhythmia, diabetes mellitus, stress/depression and overconsumption of alcohol are the most important treatable vascular risk factors. In this article, we will also report on at present less well known treatable vascular risk fa...
Source: Praxis - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Praxis (Bern 1994) Source Type: research
Tatjana PS Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with increased risk of death, stroke and heart failure. The prevalence and incidence of AF is increasing due to better overall medical treatment, longer survival and increasing incidence of cardiometabolic and lifestyle risk factors. Treatment of AF and AF-related complications significantly increase health-care costs. In addition, use of conventional rhythm control strategies (i.g. antiarrhyhtmic drugs and catheter-ablation) is associated with limited efficacy for sinus rhythm maintenance and serious adverse effe...
Source: Polish Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Kardiol Pol Source Type: research
Authors: Valentí V, Cienfuegos JA, Becerril Mañas S, Frühbeck G Abstract Bariatric-metabolic surgery is the safest, most effective and long-lasting treatment for obesity and its associated co-morbidities, whether they be metabolic (type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) or cardiovascular (myocardial infarction, stroke). Due to the obesity pandemic, bariatric-metabolic surgery is the second most frequent intra-abdominal procedure and the gastroenterologist and the surgeon must be aware of the physiologic changes caused by the anatomic reconfiguration following surgery. ...
Source: Revista Espanola de Enfermedades Digestivas - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Rev Esp Enferm Dig Source Type: research
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