Outcomes of Acute Myocardial Infarction in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

There is paucity of data on the outcomes of acute myocardial infarction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the contemporary era.
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Research Study Source Type: research

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ConclusionsHS patients show a broad spectrum of inflammatory and metabolic syndrome-related comorbidities, with an increased risk by concurrent PsO. Important for clinical practice, the elevated cardiovascular risk of HS patients can be largely attributed to smoking.
Source: Dermatology and Therapy - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
ConclusionIn rheumatoid arthritis, bDMARD use associated with reduced CVD risk, protective calcification of non ‐calcified lesions and lower likelihood of new plaque formation in patients with early atherosclerosis.
Source: Arthritis and Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: FULL LENGTH Source Type: research
Conclusions: This analysis showed a significantly higher mortality risk in CAD patients with RA when compared to the control group. Congestive heart failure also significantly manifested more in CAD patients with co-existing RA. However, the risks all the other cardiovascular outcomes were similar in both groups. Nevertheless, due to the several limitations of this analysis, this hypothesis should be confirmed in forthcoming trials based on larger numbers of CAD patients with co-existing RA.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Source Type: research
The vagus nerve plays an important role in maintaining physiological homeostasis, which includes reflex pathways that regulate cardiac function. The link between vagus nerve activity and the high-frequency component of heart rate variability (HRV) has been well established, correlating with vagal tone. Recently, vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been investigated as a therapeutic for a multitude of diseases, such as treatment-resistant epilepsy, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and asthma. Because of the vagus nerve's innervation of the heart, VNS has been identified as a potential therapy for cardiovascular disorder...
Source: Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Bioelectronic Medicine TECHNIQUES Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: Canadian Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Ming-Jer Hsieh, Cheng-Hung Lee, Ming-Lung Tsai, Chang-Fu Kao, Wen-Ching Lan, Yu-Tung Huang, Wen-Yi Tseng, Ming-Shien Wen, Shang-Hung ChangAbstractBackgroundTumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) improve joints outcomes and reduce cardiovascular (CV) risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, 20-45% of RA patients are TNFi poor responders and have a significantly higher risk of CV events. In these TNFi non-responders, the use of second-line biological agents to improve synovial outcomes is supported by clinical...
Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
In this study, we investigated the link between AF and senescence markers through the assessment of protein expression in the tissue lysates of human appendages from patients in AF, including paroxysmal (PAF) or permanent AF (PmAF), and in sinus rhythm (SR). The major findings of the study indicated that the progression of AF is strongly related to the human atrial senescence burden as determined by p53 and p16 expression. The stepwise increase of senescence (p53, p16), prothrombotic (TF), and proremodeling (MMP-9) markers observed in the right atrial appendages of patients in SR, PAF, and PmAF points toward multiple inter...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs
Abstract In an editorial in an earlier issue of this journal, Johanson &Tinnerberg (1) expressed serious and well-founded concern over the large number of future occupational cancer cases that will result if exposures for a number of substances are not reduced below the so-called "binding occupational exposure limit values" (BOELV) issued by the EU (2). The balance between what is perceived as possible to comply with and the foreseeable health gain when setting BOELV is further discussed in a letter to the Editor by Cherrie (3). This debate raises several important aspects of how to protect workers f...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Authors: Tags: Scand J Work Environ Health Source Type: research
In this study, the enhanced mice live somewhat longer than their unmodified peers, though not as much longer as is the case for the application of telomerase gene therapy. The mice do also exhibit reduced cancer risk, however. The scientists here class telomere shortening as a cause of aging, which is not a point universally agreed upon. Reductions in average telomere length in tissues looks much more like a downstream consequence of reduced stem cell activity than an independent mechanism. Researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres and show that it is possible to extend life without any geneti...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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