Drug Targeting of Genomic Instability in Multiple Myeloma

Genomic instability can be observed at both chromosomal and chromatin levels. Instability at the macro level includes centrosome abnormalities (CA) resulting in numerical as well as structural chromosomal changes, whereas instability at the micro level is characterized by defects in DNA repair pathways resulting in microsatellite instability (MIN) or mutations. Genomic instability occurs during carcinogenesis without impairing survival and growth, though the precise mechanisms remain unclear. Solid tumors arising from most cells of epithelial origin are characterized by genomic instability which renders them resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This instability is also observed in 25% of myeloma patients and has been shown to be highly prognostic, independently of the international staging system (ISS). However, a biomarker of aberrant DNA repair and loss of heterozygosity (LOH), was only observed at a frequency of 5% in newly diagnosed patients. Several new molecules targeting the pathways involved in genomic instability are under development and some have already entered clinical trials. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) inhibitors have been FDA-approved for the treatment of breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1)-mutated metastatic breast cancer, as well as ovarian and lung cancer. Topoisomerase inhibitors and epigenetic histone modification-targeting inhibitors, such as HDAC (Histone Deacetylase) inhibitors which are novel agents that can target geno...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research

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Discussion MDSCs violently emerge in pathological conditions in an attempt to limit potentially harmful immune and inflammatory responses. Mechanisms supporting their expansion and survival are deeply investigated in cancer, in the perspective to reactivate specific antitumor responses and prevent their contribution to disease evolution. These findings will likely contribute to improve the targeting of MDSCs in anticancer immunotherapies, either alone or in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors. New evidence indicates that the expansion of myeloid cell differentiation in pathology is subject to fine-tuning, as its...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusion MTDH is pro-oncogenic factor playing multifaceted and diverse roles in cancer progression. Its association and central role in regulating signaling pathways such a MAPK, wnt/β-catenin, PI3K/AkT, NF-κβ pathways in various cancers shows that it plays a vital role in metastasis. MTDH contribution to chemo and radiotherapy resistance provides a new direction for the development of anticancer therapeutics. Multiple mechanisms converge to promote expression of MTDH in cancers. Further studies are therefore warranted to determine whether the elevated MTDH expression has prognostic value for development...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions Several model systems are now available to characterize the MSC-tumour interplay in the TME. These offer early promise in establishing robust preclinical platforms for the identification of crucial molecular pathways and for the assessment of clinical efficacy of novel drugs to inhibit cancer development and progression. However, selection of the right model for a given study should be shaped on the purpose, and should also consider fixed biological, biochemical, and biophysical parameters according to the specific tumour type. Finally, in order to get reliable and useful results to be translated to the clinic...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions This review describes how leukocyte-heparanase can be a double-edged sword in tumor progression; it can enhance tumor immune surveillance and tumor cell clearance, but also promote tumor survival and growth. We also discuss the potential of using heparanase in leukocyte therapies against tumors, and the effects of heparanase inhibitors on tumor progression and immunity. We are just beginning to understand the influence of heparanase on a pro/anti-tumor immune response, and there are still many questions to answer. How do the pro/anti-tumorigenic effects of heparanase differ across different cancer types? Does...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Eleonora A. Braga1*†, Marina V. Fridman2†, Vitaly I. Loginov1,3, Alexey A. Dmitriev4 and Sergey G. Morozov1 1Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Moscow, Russia 2Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia 3Research Center of Medical Genetics, Moscow, Russia 4Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the third most common urological cancer, and it has the highest mortality rate. The increasing drug resistance of metastatic ccRCC has resulted in the search f...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Conclusions MDSC are major players in the immunosuppressive scenario in cancer, thanks to their phenotype heterogeneity and critical interaction with several innate immune cells, thus representing a crucial target in oncology. Here we reviewed the interactions of MDSCs with NK cells. The contribution of key cytokines, chemokines and mediators active in this process have been discussed. We also described the contribution of MDSC on angiogenesis directly or indirectly through interactions with NK and immunosuppressive activities. A parallel of the cancer associated to the decidual counterpart of these cells is discussed, a...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Markus Hartl* and Rainer Schneider Center of Molecular Biosciences (CMBI), Institute of Biochemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria The neuronal proteins GAP43 (neuromodulin), MARCKS, and BASP1 are highly expressed in the growth cones of nerve cells where they are involved in signal transmission and cytoskeleton organization. Although their primary structures are unrelated, these signaling proteins share several structural properties like fatty acid modification, and the presence of cationic effector domains. GAP43, MARCKS, and BASP1 bind to cell membrane phospholipids, a process reversibly regulate...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Discussion Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 is an essential molecule for maintaining immune homeostasis and subverting inflammation. Disorders arising from excess inflammation or SOCS1 deficiency can be potentially treated with SOCS1 mimetics (Ahmed et al., 2015). While SOCS1 has promising potential in many disorders, it should be noted that new targets and actions of SOCS1 are still being discovered and not all the effects of this protein are beneficial in autoimmune diseases and cancer. For instance, SOCS1 degrades IRS1 and IRS2, required for insulin signaling, via the SOCS Box domain, thus, limiting its potential in ...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Conclusions: CAR T cell therapies have demonstrated the clinical benefits of harnessing our body's own defenses to combat tumor cells. Similar research is being conducted on lesser known modifications and gene-modified immune cells, which we highlight in this review. Introduction Chimeric antigen receptors and engineered T cell receptors (based on previously identified high affinity T cell receptors) function by redirecting T cells to a predefined tumor-specific (or tumor-associated) target. Most of these modifications use retroviral or lentiviral vectors to integrate the construct, and most of the receptors ...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION Cognitive impairment can affect daily functioning, quality of life, and capacity to work in patients with cancer and those in remission. Consequently, cognitive assessment is now an important and necessary part of a comprehensive oncological care plan. Cancer-related cognitive impairment might be due to the direct effects of the cancer itself, nonspecific factors, or comorbid conditions that are independent of the disease and/or due to the adverse effects of the treatment or combination of treatments given for the disease. The prevalence and extent of cognitive impairment associated with cancer is recognized but...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognition Current Issue Neuro oncology Neurology Review cancer chemotherapy cognitive impairment neuropsychological assessment treatment Source Type: research
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