Can Breathing Exercises Help Clear Lungs? Dr. Mallika Marshall Answers Your Coronavirus Questions

BOSTON (CBS) – As the number of coronavirus cases continues to grow, we are receiving a number of questions from the public. Dr. Mallika Marshall answered some of the questions sent to WBZ-TV’s Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter accounts. My 85-year old mother would like my cousin who is a hairdresser to come over and do her hair. My cousin is not sick. Would that be OK? – Bruce in Medfield I don’t think that’s a good idea. Many of us rely heavily on our hairdressers. But no, you should not have someone come inside the house to do your hair. It’s not worth the risk. Your cousin could have the infection and not know it. And your mom is over 65 and therefore at higher risk of serious infection. If you never leave your house, how often should you wash your hands? – Thomas, Facebook If you never leave your house and no one and nothing ever enters the house, then you can wash your hands like you normally would – after using the restroom and before eating or when they get soiled. However, if you’re receiving takeout or packages or mail, I would wash them anytime you touch something or someone that could potentially be contaminated. Are people with high blood pressure at particularly high risk of COVID-19? – Jim Studies have found that people with high blood pressure are at higher risk of getting sicker from coronavirus. It’s not clear why. Some people with high blood pressure have underlying heart disease and COVID-19 ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Coronavirus Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

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This article proposes strategies to ensure the ongoing effectiveness, efficiency and engagement of lectures transitioning from face-to-face to online delivery. Cognitive learning theory, strategies to promote learner engagement and minimise distraction, and examples of software affordances to support active learning during the lecture are proposed. This enables lecturers to navigate the challenges of lecturing in an online environment and plan fruitful online lectures during this disruptive time. These suggestions will therefore enable HPE to better meet the existing and future needs of regional, rural and remote learners ...
Source: Rural and Remote Health - Category: Rural Health Tags: Rural Remote Health Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 29 May 2020Source: The Lancet Respiratory MedicineAuthor(s): James H Hull, Julie K Lloyd, Brendan G Cooper
Source: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 29 May 2020Source: The Lancet Respiratory MedicineAuthor(s): Talha Khan Burki
Source: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 29 May 2020Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesAuthor(s): Alessandro Mantovani, Christopher D. Byrne, Ming-Hua Zheng, Giovanni Targher
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 29 May 2020Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesAuthor(s): Elisabetta Torlone, Camilla Festa, Gloria Formoso, Marina Scavini, Maria Angela Sculli, Elena Succurro, Laura Sciacca, Paolo Di Bartolo, Francesco Purrello, Annunziata Lapolla
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
New York City, the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S., is on track to slowly reopen. However, other states throughout the country are still experiencing increases in coronavirus cases. Tom Hanson reports.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
AbstractSevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects host cells following binding with the cell surface ACE2 receptors, thereby leading to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). SARS-CoV-2 causes viral pneumonia with additional extrapulmonary manifestations and major complications, including acute myocardial injury, arrhythmia, and shock mainly in elderly patients. Furthermore, patients with existing cardiovascular comorbidities, such as hypertension and coronary heart disease, have a worse clinical outcome following contraction of the viral illness. A striking feature of COVID-19 pandemics is the hig...
Source: AGE - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a global health emergency by the World Health Organization on December 31, 2019 and a global pandemic on March 11, 2020. The most significant health problem associated with COVID-19 has been identified as a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) leading to pneumonia, respiratory failure and death. Elderly individuals with chronic health conditions (e.g., hypertension, asthma, diabetes, coronary heart disease) are more vulnerable.
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research
By SIMON YU, MD, LT COL, USA (Ret) Dr. Tom Frieden, former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), opened up a new front in the Coronavirus War by saying we don’t just need to treat the acute disease, we need to treat the underlying conditions that make people more susceptible to serious disease progression. He focused on heart disease, and managing mitigating risk factors such as CVD, diabetes, hypertension and smoking in order to increase people’s odds for recovery. The initial focus has been pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), with risk factors including ast...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 CDC chronic disease holistic care Pandemic SDoH Source Type: blogs
One of the worst symptoms of any plague is uncertainty—who it will strike, when it will end, why it began. Merely understanding a pandemic does not stop it, but an informed public can help curb its impact and slow its spread. It can also provide a certain ease of mind in a decidedly uneasy time. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 pandemic from TIME’s readers, along with the best and most current answers science can provide. A note about our sourcing: While there are many, many studies underway investigating COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-19, the novel coronavirus that causes the illn...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Source Type: news
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