Imminent rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by arteriovenous fistulaization and hepatorenal failure: case report and literature review.

Imminent rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by arteriovenous fistulaization and hepatorenal failure: case report and literature review. Rev Cardiovasc Med. 2020 Mar 30;21(1):119-122 Authors: Huang D, Song F, Zhou X, Ma H, Chen S, Xie Y, Wang S, Qin T Abstract Arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is a rare complication of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with complex clinical features. However, AVF and AAA usually cause no symptoms except when they rupture. This case study demonstrated that ultrasonography was a rapid and non-invasive method for the initial assessment of AAA and AVF. A 65-year-old man was admitted to the intensive care unit with hepatic and renal dysfunction. Physical examination revealed an abdominal vascular murmur and bilateral toe discoloration. Ultrasonic examination revealed an AAA and right common iliac artery aneurysm with an AVF located between the right common iliac artery and inferior vena cava. A computed tomography scan confirmed the sonographic findings. We propose that ultrasound should be used more commonly as part of the initial evaluation of the potential and established vascular diseases. PMID: 32259910 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Tags: Rev Cardiovasc Med Source Type: research

Related Links:

on Ristow A Abstract OBJECTIVE: The bell-bottom technique is a widely used technique to treat aortoiliac aneurysms with preservation of the hypogastric arteries. The published data are scarce with conflicting results regarding the evolution. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of patients submitted to endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with standard technique (S-EVAR) versus bell-bottom technique. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study compared the outcomes of standard endovascular aneurysm repair (
Source: Vascular - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Vascular Source Type: research
Abstract Point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) is performed by a physician at the bedside and is standard practice in obstetric, emergency, and musculoskeletal medicine. When compared with formal sonography, POCUS is equivalent in screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm and as accurate in diagnosing deep venous thrombosis. POCUS has high accuracy for diagnosing pneumonia and detecting acute decompensated heart failure but is less accurate than computed tomography for identifying pulmonary embolism. POCUS confirmation of intrauterine pregnancy rules out an ectopic pregnancy. In the third trimester of high-risk preg...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
Introduction: Yearly imaging surveillance is recommended to all patients following endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) to detect complications requiring re-intervention. EVAR is currently the predominant technique for elective infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in the Netherlands. Consequently, a cumulative amount of hospital visits for imaging surveillance will arise. This causes a burden on both patients and the healthcare system. We therefore aimed to study the re-intervention free survival and survival stratified for patients with and without yearly imaging surveillance.
Source: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundAbdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a focal aortic dilatation progressing towards rupture. Non-invasive AAA-associated cell proliferation biomarkers are not yet established. We investigated the feasibility of the cell proliferation radiotracer, fluorine-18-fluorothymidine ([18F]FLT) with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in a progressive pre-clinical AAA model (angiotensin II, AngII infusion).Methods and ResultsFourteen-week-old apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE−/−) mice received saline or AngII via osmotic mini-pumps for 14 (n  =  7 and 5, respectively) or 2...
Source: Journal of Nuclear Cardiology - Category: Nuclear Medicine Source Type: research
A 75-year-old morbidly obese man presented with increasing diameter of a known abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and right common iliac artery aneurysm. He was diagnosed with these aneurysms at the age of 69  years while undergoing computed tomography for evaluation of pancreatic cancer. At the time of diagnosis, the AAA diameter was 3.9 cm. His past medical history was significant for hypertension and hyperlipidemia. He was observed with serial aortoiliac duplex ultrasound scans. By November 2018 (6  years after the original diagnosis), the AAA diameter increased to 6.3 cm and the right common iliac arte...
Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Vascular images Source Type: research
Conclusions: Using an established mouse model of AAA, we successfully demonstrated in vivo targeting of EL-GNPs to damaged aortic elastin and correlated micro-CT-based signal intensities with burst pressures. Thus, we show that this novel targeting technique can be used as a diagnostic tool to predict the degree of elastin damage and therefore rupture potential in AAAs better than the extent of dilation.
Source: Theranostics - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
We present a case of successfully treated abdominal aortic aneurysm in a 24-year old patient with Marfan ’s syndrome. Following initial physical and ultrasound examination, the multislice computed tomography scan revealed infrarenal aortic aneurysm of 6 cm in diameter, 10 cm long, along with slightly dilated iliac arteries. However, dimensions of aortic root, aortic arch and descending suprarenal aor ta were within normal limits. Further on, since the patient presented with signs of impending rupture, an urgent surgical intervention was performed.
Source: Annals of Vascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
We present a case of successfully treated abdominal aortic aneurysm in a 24-year-old patient with Marfan syndrome. After initial physical and ultrasound examination, the multislice computed tomography (MSCT) scan revealed infrarenal aortic aneurysm of 6  cm in diameter, 10 cm long, along with slightly dilated iliac arteries. However, dimensions of aortic root, aortic arch, and descending suprarenal aorta were within normal limits. Further on, because the patient presented with signs of impending rupture, an urgent surgical intervention was perfor med.
Source: Annals of Vascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The mid-term experience with Ovation demonstrates safe, durable treatment of iAAAs, including those with unfavourable anatomy, frequently off IFU for other commonly used devices. PMID: 29292208 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: PubMed: Eur J Vasc Endovasc ... - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg Source Type: research
This review demonstrates that both ultrasound modalities (with or without contrast) showed high specificity. For ruling in endoleaks, contrast-enhanced color duplex ultrasound (CE-CDUS) appears superior to CDUS. In an endoleak surveillance program, CE-CDUS can be introduced as a routine diagnostic modality followed by CT scan only when the ultrasound is positive to establish the type of endoleak and the subsequent therapeutic management.
Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Vascular vantage point Source Type: research
More News: Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm | Aortic Aneurysm | Cardiology | Cardiovascular | CT Scan | Heart | Intensive Care | PET Scan | Study | Ultrasound