Want to Stop the Next Pandemic? Start Protecting Wildlife Habitats

(Bloomberg) — There are four critical facets of pandemic prevention, according to Lee Hannah, senior scientist at Conservation International. Three of them make immediate sense against the backdrop of our current emergency: stockpile masks and respirators; have testing infrastructure ready; and ban the global wildlife trade, including the open animal markets where COVID-19 may have first infected people. His fourth recommendation is more grandiose: “Take care of nature.” The assault on ecosystems that allowed COVID-19 to jump from animals to humans went far beyond merchants hunting and selling rare wildlife. Biodiversity—that is, the health of the entire ecosystem—can restrain pathogens before they ever leave the wild. “We need to tell people right now that there is a series of things we need to do once we’re out of this mess to make sure it never happens again,” Hannah says. Read more: Don’t Blame China. The Next Pandemic Could Come From Anywhere The role of biodiversity in disease prevention has received increased attention of late. In a 2015 “state of knowledge review” of biodiversity and human health by the United Nations, scientists wrote that “an ecological approach to disease, rather than a simplistic ‘one germ, one disease’ approach, will provide a richer understanding of disease-related outcomes.” Recent research has given more support to the idea that biodiversity protection i...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news

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Authors: Shi YQ, Qi WF, Kong CY Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which normally manifests as a multi‑joint inflammatory reaction, is a common immunological disease in clinical practice. However, the pathogenesis of RA has not yet been fully elucidated. Rituximab (RTX) is an effective drug in the treatment of RA, however its therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of action require further investigation. Thus, the present study aimed to screen the candidate key regulatory genes and explain the potential mechanisms of RA. Gene chips of RA and normal joint tissues were analyzed and, gene chips of RTX before and after ...
Source: Molecular Medicine Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Mol Med Rep Source Type: research
In conclusion, TCGA classification based on a Chinese population is the same as TCGA typing based on a European population in terms of proportion and clinical characteristics, but there are differences in gene amplification and gene mutation. ACRG molecular classification could be performed by IHC analysis and may be a valuable independent prognostic marker for patients with GC. PMID: 32468041 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Molecular Medicine Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Mol Med Rep Source Type: research
This article proposes strategies to ensure the ongoing effectiveness, efficiency and engagement of lectures transitioning from face-to-face to online delivery. Cognitive learning theory, strategies to promote learner engagement and minimise distraction, and examples of software affordances to support active learning during the lecture are proposed. This enables lecturers to navigate the challenges of lecturing in an online environment and plan fruitful online lectures during this disruptive time. These suggestions will therefore enable HPE to better meet the existing and future needs of regional, rural and remote learners ...
Source: Rural and Remote Health - Category: Rural Health Tags: Rural Remote Health Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 29 May 2020Source: The Lancet Respiratory MedicineAuthor(s): James H Hull, Julie K Lloyd, Brendan G Cooper
Source: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 29 May 2020Source: The Lancet Respiratory MedicineAuthor(s): Talha Khan Burki
Source: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 29 May 2020Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesAuthor(s): Alessandro Mantovani, Christopher D. Byrne, Ming-Hua Zheng, Giovanni Targher
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 29 May 2020Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesAuthor(s): Elisabetta Torlone, Camilla Festa, Gloria Formoso, Marina Scavini, Maria Angela Sculli, Elena Succurro, Laura Sciacca, Paolo Di Bartolo, Francesco Purrello, Annunziata Lapolla
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
New York City, the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S., is on track to slowly reopen. However, other states throughout the country are still experiencing increases in coronavirus cases. Tom Hanson reports.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Families across England will finally be able to see their elderly relatives again tomorrow, as millions of vulnerable people 'shielding' are allowed to spend time outdoors as the lockdown is eased.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
As if Covid-19 wasn't enough to worry about, now there is violence and civil unrest in big cities across the country. What is happening? It's like LA 92 again.
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Pharmacy Source Type: forums
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