Government must not allow universities to fail during the coronavirus outbreak, warn unions

Universities must be given extra protection during the Covid-19 pandemic to ensure their financial survival because of their vital contribution to the economy, local communities and crucial medical research, unions are warning the government today (Tuesday). In a joint letter to higher education minister Michelle Donelan, five unions representing higher education (HE) staff ask for urgent assurances that universities will not be allowed to go under as a result of the outbreak, backed up with legislation. UNISON, University and College Union (UCU), GMB, Unite and the Educational Institute of Scotland (EIS) say the sector is too valuable for any institutions to get into financial difficulties and will play a key role in rebuilding the country. Some universities are the biggest employer in their area and whole communities are reliant on them, the unions say, with the HE sector employing around 750,000 people. In addition to biological research, their work is key to understanding the impact of the outbreak on society, psychologically and economically. The letter says: “The higher education sector is vital in addressing this current crisis. University research is central in developing tests for the illness and antibody tests, in tracking Covid-19, in developing vaccines and carrying out medical research. “A stable and well-resourced higher education sector will be vital in getting through this crisis. “The university sector is one of the most productive and ...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: News Press release coronavirus higher education ruth levin universities Source Type: news

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Eunice G. Kamwendo is an Economist and Strategic Advisor with UNDP Africa in New York. Chaltu Daniel Kalbessa is a UNDP Fellow and Strategic Analyst with UNDP Africa in New York.By Eunice G. Kamwendo and Chaltu Daniel KalbessaNEW YORK, Jun 3 2020 (IPS) With very weak health systems and overall capacity constraints to effectively respond to the deadly coronavirus disease, Africa’s fate against the invisible enemy, was going to be nothing short of catastrophic according to early predictions. Although Africa is yet to reach its peak, many countries are not seeing the exponential growth in case numbers, or in mortality r...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Aid Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
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Source: Indian Journal of Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
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Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Medical Practice Primary Care Ken Terry Paul Grundy Source Type: blogs
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Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news
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Source: Panminerva Medica - Category: General Medicine Tags: Panminerva Med Source Type: research
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Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Armenia World news US news Coronavirus outbreak Science Vaccines and immunisation Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME100 Talks Source Type: news
As nations around the world scramble to bring coronavirus outbreaks under control, Dr. Raj Panjabi is worried that the world’s poor populations will be excluded from accessing treatments and prevention measures, a scenario he calls “viral apartheid.” “I don’t use that term lightly,” said Panjabi, speaking with TIME Senior Writer Alice Park during a TIME 100 Talks discussion on May 28. “The idea that a group of people—whether it’s the vaccines, the test or treatments—will get access to those vital life-saving tools, and that those will likely be the rich nations an...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME100 Talks Source Type: news
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Source: American Journal of Clinical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
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