A bioinformatics approach revealed the transcription factors of helicobacter pylori pathogenic genes and their regulatory network nodes

Publication date: Available online 6 April 2020Source: Electronic Journal of BiotechnologyAuthor(s): Yu Bai, Wenliang Li, Guangyu Xu, Guihua Cui
Source: Electronic Journal of Biotechnology - Category: Biotechnology Source Type: research

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Publication date: August 2020Source: Cancer Epidemiology, Volume 67Author(s): Mark T. Whary, Jose M. Restrepo Avenia, Luis E. Bravo, Jennifer L. Lofgren, Kvin Lertpiriyapong, Robertino Mera-Giler, M. Blanca Piazuelo, Pelayo Correa, Richard M. Peek, Keith T. Wilson, James G. Fox
Source: Cancer Epidemiology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Source: International Journal of General Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: International Journal of General Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 May 2020Source: Biotechnology ReportsAuthor(s): Doha Abou Baker
Source: Biotechnology Reports - Category: Biotechnology Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe  findings of the present study is perhaps the first histological evidence of a possible modulatory effect of IH on the gastric mucosal inflammatory response due to H. pylori infection  in humans.
Source: Indian Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
In this study, we generated H. pylori strains producing chimeric proteins in which VacA m1 segments of a parental strain were replaced by corresponding m2 sequences. In comparison to the parental m1 VacA protein, a chimeric protein (designated m2/m1) containing m2 sequences in the N-terminal portion of the m region was less potent in causing vacuolation of HeLa cells, AGS gastric cells, and AZ-521 duodenal cells and had reduced capacity to cause membrane depolarization or death of AZ-521 cells. Consistent with the observed differences in activity, the chimeric m2/m1 VacA protein bound to cells at reduced levels compared to...
Source: Infection and Immunity - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Molecular Pathogenesis Source Type: research
Chronic Helicobacter pylori colonization in animal models often leads to downregulation of the type IV secretion system (T4SS), typically by recombination in cagY, which is an essential T4SS gene. However, 17 other cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) genes, as well as some non-cagPAI genes, are also essential for T4SS function. To get a more complete picture of how H. pylori regulates the T4SS during animal colonization, we examined cagY in 534 mouse-passaged isolates that lost T4SS function, defined as a normalized interleukin-8 (IL-8) value of
Source: Infection and Immunity - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Molecular Pathogenesis Source Type: research
Functional flagella formation is a widespread virulence factor that plays a critical role in survival and host colonization. Flagellar synthesis is a complex and highly coordinated process. The assembly of the axial structure beyond the cell membrane is mediated by export chaperone proteins that transport their cognate substrates to the export gate complex. The export chaperone FliS interacts with flagellin, the basic component used to construct the filament. Unlike enterobacteria, the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori produces two different flagellins, FlaA and FlaB, which exhibit distinct spatial localization patterns...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Conclusion: No significant difference was observed in detecting H. pylori when ELISA was conducted using IVB or DBS stored at 4°C and transported even after 48 h. This confirms that DBS collected even in compromised conditions in the field can be used for detecting infection.
Source: Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions: NAFLD may be associated with H. pylori infection in a Chinese population. Younger, male NAFLD patients and those meeting more characteristics of MS were more likely to have H. pylori infection. PMID: 32411211 [PubMed]
Source: Gastroenterology Research and Practice - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Gastroenterol Res Pract Source Type: research
Authors: Niu Q, Zhu J, Yu X, Feng T, Ji H, Li Y, Zhang W, Hu B Abstract Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the dominant member of the gastric microbiota and has infected more than half of the human population, of whom 5-15% develop gastric diseases ranging from gastritis and metaplasia to gastric cancer. These diseases always follow inflammation induced by cell surface and intracellular receptors and subsequent signaling, such as the NF-κB pathway and inflammasomes. Some types of immune cells are recruited to enforce an antibacterial response, which could be impeded by H. pylori virulence factors with or with...
Source: Gastroenterology Research and Practice - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Gastroenterol Res Pract Source Type: research
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