Round Spermatid Injection

From a fertility perspective, men with azoospermia represent a challenging patient population. When no mature spermatozoa are obtained during a testicular sperm extraction, patients are often left with limited options, such as adoption or the use of donor sperm. However, it has been reported that round spermatids can be successfully injected into human oocytes and used as an alternative to mature spermatozoa. This technique is known as round spermatid injection (ROSI). Despite the limitations of ROSI and diminished clinical success rates, the use of round spermatids for fertilization may have potential as a treatment modality for men with azoospermia.
Source: Urologic Clinics of North America - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS The hormonal levels or patient's BMI could not predict positive sperm retrieval outcome, however a negative correlation between serum testosterone and BMI levels was calculated implicating influence on fertility. PMID: 32472670 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
In every surgical field, paradigm shifts occur through innovation in either surgical approach or technology, and in the most dramatic instances through a combination of the two. For male reproductive surgery, a prime example is the advent of microdissection testicular sperm extraction (microTESE), in which technology (the operative microscope) facilitated a novel approach —high-magnification search for seminiferous tubules with distinct appearance—that dramatically changed the treatment paradigm for men with nonobstructive azoospermia.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Inklings Source Type: research
We appreciate the thoughtful comments on our manuscript. This work was intended to show proof of concept of a novel sperm sorting device designed to expedite and maximize sperm retrieval rates during microdissection testicular sperm extraction for men with nonobstructive azoospermia. We first began exploring using microfluidics to optimize sperm retrieval rates from microdissection testicular sperm extraction in 2013 and this work, along with our prior publications have laid the groundwork for a potential clinical trial.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
Sperm identification during microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE) for nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) remains one of the greatest challenges in the surgical management of male factor infertility. The ability to successfully find sperm during micro-TESE is impacted by numerous factors: patient factors such as whether sperm is even present, laboratory processing techniques, person-hours spent searching for sperm, and the experience and expertise of the reproductive urology, embryology, and andrology team.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
Conditions:   Azoospermia, Nonobstructive;   Varicocele Intervention:   Procedure: micro-surgical varicocelectomy Sponsor:   Cairo University Completed
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
CONCLUSION: Scrotal MRI is a very effective tool for the evaluation of azoospermic men and may provide important information facilitating interventional treatment of infertility. PMID: 32441653 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology : The Turkish Society of Radiology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Diagn Interv Radiol Source Type: research
Conditions:   Azoospermia, Nonobstructive;   Varicocele Intervention:   Procedure: micro-surgical varicocelectomy Sponsor:   Cairo University Completed
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
We report the following outcomes: (1) live birth rates in AID and IVF-D treatment for couples with severe male infertility factors and prior ICSI failures; (2) paternal impact on embryo development of the same oocyte cohort; (3) prognostic factors in obtaining a live birth with donor semen.ResultsOf 92 women with failed ICSI cycles (26 with multiple attempts), 45 couples underwent AID treatment. Live birth rate per cycle of AID was 18.9%. Fifty-three patients underwent IVF-D including 6 couples who previously did not conceive with AID. Embryological outcomes including fertilization, viable cleavage embryos, and blastocyst ...
Source: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
TESAis a simple technique by which doctors can extract sperm from the testes. It ’s partly because it's so simple, that it's often been abused, misused and overused.Thus, many doctors will do TESA unnecessarily , and extract sperm directly from the testes, even in men who have sperm in the semen sample. Not only is this cruel, it also adds needlessly to their expense – without improving the pregnancy rate ! They use all kinds of pretext to justify this TESE ( for example, by claiming that the sperm will be “fresher” or will have lesser DNA fragmentation, but this is rubbish !). The reality is they d...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsThe finding in our patient and the discussion on the reviewed literature support a possible role forUSP26 in male fertility.
Source: Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: CLINICAL REPORT Source Type: research
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