Killing Pain - Use of Analgesic, Sedative and Anxiolytic Medication and the Development of Psychiatric Illness in Adolescents

Conditions:   PTSD;   Psychiatric Illness;   Prescription Drug Dependence;   Addiction Interventions:   Other: Age & Development;   Other: Socioeconomy;   Other: Traumatic Events;   Other: Psychosocial conditions;   Other: Lifestyle;   Other: Chronic conditions;   Other: Somatic symptoms;   Other: Psychological symptoms;   Other: Non-prescription analgesics;   Other: Prescription drugs Sponsors:   Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies;   Oslo University Hospital;   The Change Factory;   Norwegian Council for Mental Health;   Dam Foundation;   Norwegian Institute of Public Health Active, not recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials

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Conclusions: Kratom use may serve as a self-treatment strategy for a diverse population of patients with pre-existing health diagnoses. Healthcare providers need to be engaging with patients to address safety concerns and potential limitations of its use in clinical practice for specific health conditions.
Source: Journal of Addiction Medicine - Category: Addiction Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our findings indicate that bodily pain is longitudinally associated with NMUPD among male soldiers, but not with illicit drugs. Significantly, our results stem from a non-clinical sample of soldiers with overall lower levels of pain. This indicates that pain may be important, even at lower levels, and underscores the importance of early non-pharmacologic interventions for pain. PMID: 32315933 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Addictive Behaviors - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addict Behav Source Type: research
Conditions:   PTSD;   Psychiatric Illness;   Prescription Drug Dependence;   Addiction Interventions:   Other: Age & Development;   Other: Socioeconomy;   Other: Traumatic Events;   Other: Psychosocial conditions;   Other: Lifestyle;   Other: Chronic conditions;   Other: Somatic symptoms;   Other: Psychological symptoms;   Other: Non-prescription analgesics;   Other: Prescription drugs Sponsors:   Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic ...
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
The last man that used the words “I love you” used them to control me.  He used them by not saying it back, ever, when I said it.  He used them by smugly making me say it when he wanted to hear it.  He used them by only ever saying them himself when I would work up the strength to try to end things.   He used them to make me feel bad when I didn’t “behave” how he wanted me to.  He used them to convince me of a false future that he had no intention of ever providing.  The words “I love you” meant absolutely nothing. They were alternately a crowba...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Codependence Narcissism Personal Stories Relationships & Love Addiction Recovery Alcoholism Breakups Emotional Abuse Substance Abuse Source Type: news
Wrapping up this year and looking back on the particularly interesting developments in medical technology, we at Medgadget are impressed and very excited about the future. We’re lucky to cover one of the most innovative fields of research and o...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs
I am a privileged listener, like cab drivers, clergy, bartenders and hair stylists. My ability has been long-honed, as a career therapist with over 40 years under my belt. It started way before I set foot on campus in 1977 at Glassboro State College (now Rowan University) in Glassboro, NJ. I figure it began when I was a kid and my friends would come to me for advice. Back then, I didn’t have the benefit of the education to offer anything of substance. I did learn the art of nodding, smiling and saying, “um, hummm,” while I held space. Apparently, it was what they needed, since they kept coming back for mo...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Personal Professional Source Type: blogs
Opioid Overdose: Signs, Symptoms, and What to Do Any individual who uses opioids runs the risk of overdosing. Overdoses can be fatal. In fact, more than 130 people in the United States die after overdosing on opioids every day. This makes it important to know what causes an opioid overdose, the signs that an opioid overdose is occurring, and what to do in the event of an opioid overdose. Opioid Overdose Causes In 2017, the CDC reported that more than 15,000 individuals died from drug overdoses involving heroin in the United States. That’s almost 5 deaths for every 100,000 Americans. However, there are some people who...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Painkiller drug overdose opiate addiction opioid opioids Source Type: blogs
Opioids are a group of very strong pain relievers used to relieve pain after a surgery or traumatic injury. They are much more effective than over-the-counter pain relievers, however, they are also highly addictive. People who suffer from mental health conditions are much more likely to become addicted to opioids, making it important to understand the link between opioids and mental health. The Connection Between Addiction to Opioids and Mental Health People with mood and anxiety disorders are twice as likely to use opioids as people without mental health disorders They are also more than three times as likely to misuse ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Mental Health mental health costs mental health coverage mental illness opiate addiction opiates opioid opioid crisis opioids Source Type: blogs
While recreational marijuana is legal in 11 states as of November 2019, more states gravitating toward legalizing the recreational use of the substance, and 33 states allowing medical marijuana, there’s apparently no stopping this trend. Cannabis, in the form of marijuana, hemp, and cannabidiol (CBD)  is being used for pain relief, to alleviate stress, cope with anxiety, and a number of other mental health disorders and addictions. Yet, there’s a dearth of clinical studies that have been conducted on the overall effects on a user’s health. Clearly, as Crain’s Detroit Business points out, more ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Medications Substance Abuse Cannabis Marijuana Source Type: blogs
The study will give subsidised medicinal cannabis to British patients to test its impact on seven conditions - chronic pain, MS, epilepsy, PTSD, Tourette's, anxiety and drug addiction.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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