Engineered Stem Cells Survive Longer and Improve Outcomes in a Heart Patch

In most cell therapies, the transplanted cells do not survive for long, or in large numbers. They produce beneficial effects, such as reduced inflammation or enhanced regeneration, via signaling that changes the behavior of native cell populations. Considerable effort is going into finding ways to make cells used in therapy survive for a longer period of time following transplantation. The approach taken here is to engineer a fraction of the transplanted cells to produce a growth factor that improves the survival of the others. The results are demonstrated in an animal model, showing a greater regeneration of heart muscle. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been considered as one of the most promising cell sources for cell-based cardiac regeneration therapy because of their proven safety and notable paracrine effects to secrete numerous antiapoptotic and angiogenic growth factors, which enabled them to be a more competitive agent for clinical applications. However, unlike promising results obtained from preclinical models of myocardial infarction (MI), recent multiple meta-analyses have debated whether the therapeutic potential of hMSC treatment is sufficient. While these clinical trials successfully demonstrated the feasibility and safety of hMSC treatment, the researchers were unable to show significant functional benefit. In response, diverse approaches have been attempted to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of hMSCs in treating MI. For instance, ge...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

In conclusion, our study demonstrated that Nrf2 deficiency promoted the increasing trend of autophagy during aging in skeletal muscle. Nrf2 deficiency and increasing age may cause excessive autophagy in skeletal muscle, which can be a potential mechanism for the development of sarcopenia. To What Degree is Chondrocyte Hypertrophy in Osteoarthritis Due to Cellular Senescence? https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/04/to-what-degree-is-chondrocyte-hypertrophy-in-osteoarthritis-due-to-cellular-senescence/ Senescent cells are large. They do not replicate, that function is disabled, but it is as if they go ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Aging makes everything worse. Its mechanisms of damage and consequence degrade tissue function to the point of catastrophic failure, as in a heart attack. That same damage also makes the immediate consequence of a heart attack worse, and reduces regenerative capacity and the ability to respond to therapies. All in all degenerative aging is an unpleasant business, lacking an upside. The right way forward is to periodically repair the damage before it reaches a pathological level, rather than working on ways to mitigate the consequences of a sizable burden of damage. Aging elevates the susceptibility of the heart to...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, elevated brain amyloid was associated with family history and APOE ε4 allele but not with multiple other previously reported risk factors for AD. Elevated amyloid was associated with lower test performance results and increased reports of subtle recent declines in daily cognitive function. These results support the hypothesis that elevated amyloid represents an early stage in the Alzheimer's continuum. Blood Metabolites as a Marker of Frailty https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/04/blood-metabolites-as-a-marker-of-frailty/ Frailty in older people is usually diagnosed in a sympt...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study is par for the course, looking at Japanese Olympic participants. Interestingly, it hints at the upper end of the dose-response curve for physical activity, in that a longer career as a professional athlete may be detrimental in comparison to lesser degrees of exercise and training. From this large, retrospective cohort study targeting 3546 Japanese Olympic athletes, we observed significant lower mortality among Olympians compared with the Japanese general population. The overall standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 0.29. The results were consistent with previous studies conducted in other non-Asian co...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study delves into the mechanisms by which a short period of fasting can accelerate wound healing. Fasting triggers many of the same cellular stress responses, such as upregulated autophagy, as occur during the practice of calorie restriction. It isn't exactly the same, however, so it is always worth asking whether any specific biochemistry observed in either case does in fact occur in both situations. In particular, the period of refeeding following fasting appears to have beneficial effects that are distinct from those that occur while food is restricted. Multiple forms of therapeutic fasting have been repor...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
AbstractCardiovascular diseases (CVDs) pose a serious threat to human health, which are characterized by high disability and mortality rate globally such as myocardial infarction (MI), atherosclerosis, and heart failure. Although stem cells transplantation and growth factors therapy are promising, their low survival rate and loss at the site of injury are major obstacles to this therapy. Recently, the development of hydrogel scaffold materials provides a new way to solve this problem, which have shown the potential to treat CVD. Among these scaffold materials, environmentally responsive hydrogels have great prospects in re...
Source: Heart Failure Reviews - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Discussion of the Evolutionary Genetics of Aging Thymic Involution Contributes to Immunosenescence and Inflammaging The Potential for Exosome Therapies to Treat Sarcopenia Correlations of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Epigenetic Age Measures Evidence for PASK Deficiency to Reduce the Impact of Aging in Mice The Aging Retina, a Mirror of the Aging Brain Evidence for Loss of Capillary Density to be Important in Heart Disease Aspects of Immune System Aging Proceed More Rapidly in Men Deacetylation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome as a Way to Control Chronic Inflammation Transplantation of Senescent Cells is an ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Researchers here report that transplanting bone marrow from young donor mice into old recipient mice produces a range of benefits, such as improvement in the behavior of macrophage cells. Bone marrow stem cells are responsible for producing blood and immune cells, among other important populations, and this capability is degraded in a number of ways with age. Introducing younger stem cells and their supporting structures is a plausible means to at least partially reverse this process. That said, this sort of approach is unlikely to arrive in human medicine in exactly the same form, given the challenges involved in bone mar...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
In this study, we investigated the link between AF and senescence markers through the assessment of protein expression in the tissue lysates of human appendages from patients in AF, including paroxysmal (PAF) or permanent AF (PmAF), and in sinus rhythm (SR). The major findings of the study indicated that the progression of AF is strongly related to the human atrial senescence burden as determined by p53 and p16 expression. The stepwise increase of senescence (p53, p16), prothrombotic (TF), and proremodeling (MMP-9) markers observed in the right atrial appendages of patients in SR, PAF, and PmAF points toward multiple inter...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
More News: Cardiology | Clinical Trials | Gastroschisis Repair | Genetics | Heart | Heart Attack | Heart Transplant | Insulin | Research | Stem Cell Therapy | Stem Cells | Study | Transplants