HIV, Ebola, SARS and now COVID-19: Why some scientists fear deadly outbreaks are on the rise

Many experts believe that this surge in new infectious diseases is being driven in part by some of humanity's most environmentally destructive practices.
Source: L.A. Times - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news

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The COVID-19 pandemic has had significant global consequences, with healthcare systems stretched to their limits, a growing death toll, and economic devastation as economies came grinding to a halt. The pandemic and its aftereffects will be with u...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Why More Must be Done to Fight Bogus COVID-19 Cure Claims appeared first on Inter Press Service.
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health Source Type: news
This study showed that a five-day regimen is as effective as 10 days–that’s important, doctors say, since it could mean shorter stays in the hospital, which could alleviate some of the burden on the health care system. “Of course we will have to wait for the final review of all the data, but it would be very nice to have an anti-viral that’s efficacious in this terrible illness,” says Dr. Aruna Subramanian, a clinical professor of medicine at Stanford and an investigator on the study. “At least we know that we can help patients with this, and that’s really the bottom line.” T...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
Patients lie motionless in a hospital ICU ward, as doctors hurry around their beds. The patients’ faces are concealed by ventilators; the doctors’ by masks. The death rate is rising so quickly that doctors can no longer keep count. “The beds don’t even have time to cool before they are taken up by other patients,” says ICU nurse Cristina Pilati. Yet over the sound of stretchers rolling and monitors beeping, Pilati starts singing the lyrics of ‘Angel’ as she cares for a teenage boy in the ICU. ‘Spend all your time waiting, for that second chance,’ she sings. ‘For a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news
This article is part of #TIME100Talks: Finding Hope, a special series featuring leaders across different fields sharing their ideas for navigating the pandemic. Want more? Sign up for access to more virtual events, including live conversations with influential newsmakers.
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME 100 TIME100 Talks video Source Type: news
Researchers in Canada and China are testing a powerful immune booster that provides broad-spectrum protection against the common cold and a number of viruses including SARS, Ebola and H1N1. They’re currently running clinical trials to prove its effectiveness against coronavirus. I’m talking about quercetin – a powerful antioxidant that is already available as a supplement. Previous research shows that quercetin’s antiviral capacity works in three ways. Quercetin can: Stop the virus from infecting cells Reduce the reproduction of cells that are already infected And reduce infected cells resistance t...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: news
A young boy in Pakistan receives an oral polio vaccine (OPV). Credit: Ashfaq Yusufzai/IPSBy Laura MackenzieMay 6 2020 (IPS) Interruptions to vaccination programmes caused by the COVID-19 pandemic could result in new waves of measles or polio outbreaks, health experts warn. A growing number of one-off immunisation campaigns and national routine vaccine introductions are being delayed amid social distancing and other measures to curb the spread of SARS-CoV-2, leaving millions unprotected. With both preventive campaigns and routine immunisations impacted, “we’ll have an increasing number of children who will becom...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
By Osamu KusumotoTOKYO, May 5 2020 (IPS) The new coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to wreak havoc across the world, as the number of infections and deaths rapidly rise. It has the potential to infect anybody regardless of age or gender. There are grave concerns that the economic fallout from COVID-19 may be comparable to that of the Great Depression. According to Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center, there are 2,064,668 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 137,124 deaths due to SARS-CoV-2 (the virus causing COVID-19). In Japan as of noon April 15, there were 8,100 cases of COVID-19 , 119 deaths, and 901 patients discharged ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Asia-Pacific Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Poverty & SDGs Source Type: news
By Katherine Seaton, Editorial OfficerMay 04, 2020Data systems are crucial for health care all the time, but during a natural disaster, war, or pandemic like COVID-19, functioning data systems can mean the difference between life and death.Data help us know what the health needs are, what capabilities each nearby hospital and clinic has, and where health workers should be deployed. Essential for responding to a pandemic, these data help monitor the spread and intensity of disease and help everyone, not just health workers, understand its severity and impact on society.If the systems are operating smoothly, we don’t...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Digital Health Health Workforce & Systems Source Type: news
By ANISH KOKA, MD A number of politically tinged narratives have divided physicians during the pandemic. It would be unfortunate if politics obscured the major problem brought into stark relief by the pandemic: a system that marginalizes physicians and strips them of agency. In practices big and small, hospital-employed or private practice, nursing homes or hospitals, there are serious issues raising their heads for doctors and their patients. No masks for you When I walked into my office Thursday, March 12th, I assembled the office staff for the first time to talk about COVID.  The prior weekend had been...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Medical Practice Physicians Anish Koka medical autonomy Pandemic Source Type: blogs
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