What happens to people's lungs when they get coronavirus?

Respiratory physician John Wilson explains the range of Covid-19 impacts, from no symptoms to severe illness featuring pneumoniaCoronavirus – latest global updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWhat became known as Covid-19, or the coronavirus, started in late 2019 as a cluster of pneumonia cases with an unknown cause. The cause of the pneumonia was found to be a new virus – severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, or Sars-CoV-2. The illness caused by the virus is Covid-19.Now declared as a pandemic by the World Health Organisation (WHO), the majority of people who contract Covid-19 suffer only mild, cold-like symptoms.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science Medical research World news Source Type: news

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In December 2019, a novel coronavirus called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) caused an outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Severe complications have been reported to occur in 33% of patients with COVID-19 and include acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute renal failure, acute respiratory injury, septic shock, and severe pneumonia. Currently, there is no specific treatment or approved vaccine against COVID-19 and many clinical trials are currently investigating potential medications to treat COVID-19. The immunosuppressed status of some cancer patients (whether caused by the dis...
Source: American Journal of Clinical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
Authors: Ambrosino I, Barbagelata E, Ortona E, Ruggieri A, Massiah G, Giannico OV, Politi C, Moretti AM Abstract In December 2019 a novel coronavirus emerged in Wuhan, China causing many cases of severe pneumonia. World Health Organization (WHO) named this disease Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). The infection has rapidly spread across China to many other countries, and on March 12, 2020 the WHO declared pandemic outbreak of COVID-19. As of May 16, 2020, COVID-19 has been diagnosed in more than 4,490,000 patients, associated to 305,976 deaths worldwide; in Italy 224,760 COVID-19 cases have been reported with 31...
Source: Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Monaldi Arch Chest Dis Source Type: research
This study showed that a five-day regimen is as effective as 10 days–that’s important, doctors say, since it could mean shorter stays in the hospital, which could alleviate some of the burden on the health care system. “Of course we will have to wait for the final review of all the data, but it would be very nice to have an anti-viral that’s efficacious in this terrible illness,” says Dr. Aruna Subramanian, a clinical professor of medicine at Stanford and an investigator on the study. “At least we know that we can help patients with this, and that’s really the bottom line.” T...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 32438473 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: European Journal of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Eur J Immunol Source Type: research
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
The global concern is currently focused on the novel coronavirus, named as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which was isolated in China in January 2020. This virus is responsible for an outbreak of pneumonia, defined as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which appeared in Hubei province (China) at the end of 2019 and later spread worldwide [1].
Source: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
Conclusions: First-level treatments include repurposing antivirals and antimalarials, and plasma infusion should help, but development of existing or new molecules into vaccines will take time. The unpredictable trajectory of this outbreak demands careful surveillance to monitor the situation, draw strategies, implement control measures, and create proper ethical laws and medical guidelines. PMID: 32412918 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Altern Ther Health Med Source Type: research
A novel coronavirus was initially detected in Wuhan (China) starting from December 2019 in patients with severe pneumonia of unknown origin (Chen and Yu, 2020). Genome sequencing allowed to classify the virus into the subgenus Sar-becovirus of the genus Betacoronavirus; it was termed as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the illness it causes as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). On March 11, 2020 the World Health Organization declared SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, considering the over 118,000 cases of the coronavirus illness in over 110 countries around the world (World Health Organization, 2020).
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
AbstractSARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) is a coronavirus responsible for COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) which resulted in a cluster of cases of pneumonia that originated in China around 31 December 2019 and has subsequently spread across the globe. Currently, COVID-19 represents a health emergency worldwide, leading, in severe cases, to pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, multiorgan dysfunction or failure, and death. In the context of limited scientific knowledge and evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection, guidance is becoming increasingly necessary for pathologists who have to perform...
Source: Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology - Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: research
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