Bitter perception is altered in asthma and predicts its severity

Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research

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Authors: Calzavara-Pinton P, Belloni Fortina A, Bonamonte D, Marseglia GL, Miraglia Del Giudice M, Musarra A, Nettis E, Neri I, Patruno C, Stingeni L, Peris K, RADAR Group Abstract Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory disease with increasing global incidence, which has a multifactorial pathogenesis and a variable expressivity. Clinical features of AD are different in adults compared to children, but it is well recognized the substantial impact of the disease on patients' quality of life at any age. Indeed, little is known about AD in adolescence, a period of life generally associated with high psycholog...
Source: Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia - Category: Dermatology Tags: G Ital Dermatol Venereol Source Type: research
We have read with interest the report by Dribin et al investigating the association between history of asthma and anaphylaxis severity in children 1. The authors concluded that children hospitalized for anaphylaxis with a past medical history of asthma were not more likely to have severe anaphylactic reactions compared with children without asthma. However, we noticed that asthma control status at the time of anaphylaxis was not determined in the study. As mentioned by the authors, a position paper from the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology identifies asthma as a risk factor for fatal anaphylaxis, but it ...
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research
Food allergy disproportionately affects children (1), with global estimates of prevalence as high as 10% (1). Much attention has focused on the prevention, management and treatment of food allergy (1), commonly through clinical trials, which are used to inform policy and research priorities. However, these studies do not take into account shared decision-making or patient-centered preferences, or account for the underlying dogma that “evidence doesn’t make decisions – people do” (2). To date, there has been little focus on pragmatic research that allows for variability in therapy, or qualitative- an...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Wheezing is common during the preschool years, with nearly 50% of children having at least one episode of wheezing in their first 6 years of life.1 Of those children that wheeze before the age of three, at least 40% continue to wheeze by the age of six. Preschool children with wheezing episodes experience disease-related morbidity, with a 50% higher rate of outpatient visits, nearly twice the rate of emergency department (ED) visits, and nearly 3 times the rate of hospitalization compared to older children.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Our understanding of the origin of allergic diseases has increased in recent years, highlighting the importance of microbial dysbiosis and epithelial barrier dysfunction in affected tissues. Exploring the microbial-epithelial-immune crosstalk underlying the mechanisms of allergic diseases will allow the development of novel prevention and treatment strategies of allergic diseases.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
At the time of this writing, April 7, 2020, more than 1.2 million people worldwide are infected and more than 68,000 have died because of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) induced by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection, and this figure will surely multiply in the next few weeks according to Dr Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 uses angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2) (a type I transmembrane metallocarboxypeptidase) as its preferred entry receptor.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
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