Natural and vaccine-induced B cell-derived systemic and mucosal humoral immunity to human papillomavirus.

Natural and vaccine-induced B cell-derived systemic and mucosal humoral immunity to human papillomavirus. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2020 Apr 03;: Authors: Mboumba Bouassa RS, Péré H, Jenabian MA, Veyer D, Meye JF, Touzé A, Bélec L Abstract Introduction: Human papillomavirus (HPV) play an important role in the pathogenesis of mucosal neoplasia. Considering that cervical cancer is the fourth common cancer in women worldwide and that the global incidence of both HPV-associated anal and oropharyngeal cancers is constantly increasing, especially in men, infection with HPV can be regarded as a worldwide concern. HPV-specific adaptive immune response which involve CD8+ cytotoxic T cells as well as humoral responses both coordinated by CD4+ T helper cells, control most HPV infections before the development of cancers.Areas covered: We searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases for studies examining both naturally acquired and vaccine induced humoral immunity against HPV infection in female and male subjects. We identified 227 eligible studies from 1987 to 2019 that included individuals from worldwide origin. In this review, we synthesize current knowledge on systemic and mucosal humoral immunity against HPV, during natural history of infection and after prophylactic vaccination. We herein discuss the issues of the balance between viral elimination and viral escape to the host humoral immune response, the differences between natural a...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research

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Conclusion As almost half of freshman women declared being sexually inactive, the investment in public health information programs and easier access to the HPV vaccine seem to be a useful strategy for undergraduate students.Resumo Objetivo Avaliar o conhecimento sobre a infec ção pelo vírus do papiloma humano (human papillomavirus, HPV, em inglês) e a taxa de vacinação entre estudantes calouros e veteranos do quarto ano dos cursos de medicina, farmácia, fonoaudiologia, enfermagem e educação física de uma universidade brasileira. Métodos Um primeiro...
Source: Revista Brasileira de Ginecologia e Obstetricia - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Purpose of review This review attempts to give an update of epidemiological knowledge on head and neck cancers (HNC). Recent findings Worldwide, from 1990 to 2017, incidence rates for larynx and nasopharyngeal cancers decreased, whereas they increased for oro/hypopharyngeal cancers and lip/oral cavity cancers. They are still markedly higher among men than women. South Asia has the highest HNC incidence rate, followed by Europe, North America, and Australasia. Tobacco and alcohol remain the major risk factors. Rate of cancers attributable to human papillomavirus (HPV) among HNCs is highly depending on world region and...
Source: Current Opinion in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: HEAD AND NECK: Edited by Joël Guigay Source Type: research
(Karolinska Institutet) The human papillomavirus (HPV) causes, amongst other diseases, cancer of the cervix and oropharynx. A Swedish-Finnish study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases now shows that the most oncogenic HPV types can be eliminated, but only if both girls and boys are vaccinated. Both genders will be offered vaccination in Sweden as of 2020.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: The total fraction of malignant and pre-malignant lesions attributed to Human papillomavirus genotypes contained in the nonavalent vaccine is significant in both women and men, which turns this vaccine into a great asset in terms of Public Health. PMID: 32130098 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Acta Medica Portuguesa - Category: General Medicine Tags: Acta Med Port Source Type: research
Abstract HPV is still the most common sexually transmitted infection, leading to the onset of many disorders while causing an increase in direct and indirect health costs. High Risk (HR) HPV is the primary cause of invasive cervical cancer and contributes significantly to the development of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. The introduction of universal HPV vaccination has led to a significant reduction in vaccine-targeted HPV infections, cross-protective genotypes, precancerous lesions and anogenital warts. Despite the several limitations of HPV vaccination programs, including vaccine type specificity, differ...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
Authors: Okunade KS Abstract Cervical cancer is by far the most common HPV-related disease. About 99.7% of cervical cancer cases are caused by persistent genital high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Worldwide, cervical cancer is one of the most common cancer in women with an estimated 528,000 new cases reported in 2012. Most HPV infections clear spontaneously but persistent infection with the oncogenic or high-risk types may cause cancer of the oropharynx and anogenital regions. The virus usually infects the mucocutaneous epithelium and produces viral particles in matured epithelial cells and then causes...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Source Type: research
This article focuses on the epidemiology, transmission, risk factors, and clinical presentation of HPV-associated oropharyngeal SCC, and provides an update on HPV vaccination in the context of the new head and neck cancer epidemic.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants - Category: Primary Care Tags: CME: Oncology Source Type: research
AbstractIn the U.S. there is an epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). One of the most prevalent STIs is the Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Certain high risk strains of HPV are believed to cause virtually all cervical cancers, over 90% of anal cancers, 70% of oropharyngeal cancers, and the majority of anal  genital warts. HPV is preventable through vaccination and is available for both men and women. Several educational interventions have been employed, yet baseline awareness and knowledge related to HPV and 9vHPV remains relatively low among young men. What is not known is the most effective method for provid...
Source: Journal of Community Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Abstract Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes nearly all cervical cancers and some cancers of the vagina, vulva, penis, anus, and oropharynx (1).* Most HPV infections are asymptomatic and clear spontaneously within 1 to 2 years; however, persistent infection with oncogenic HPV types can lead to development of precancer or cancer (2). In the United States, the 9-valent HPV vaccine (9vHPV) is available to protect against oncogenic HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 as well as nononcogenic types 6 and 11 that cause genital warts. CDC analyzed data from the U.S. Cancer Statistics (USCS)† to assess the incide...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
Persistent infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) initiates ~5% of all human cancers, and particularly cervical and oropharyngeal cancers. HPV vaccines prevent HPV infection, but do not eliminate existing HPV infections. Papillomaviruses induce hyperproliferation of epithelial cells. In this review we discuss how hyperproliferation renders epithelial cells less sensitive to immune attack, and impacts upon the efficiency of the local immune system. These observations have significance for the design of therapeutic HPV cancer immunotherapies.
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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