10 Quarantine Activities That Don ’ t Involve Watching the News

Captain’s Log. Day eight of quarantine. Work has been busy; I’m grateful for the technology we have to collaborate and continue business during this time. I have walked around the block seven times today. I wonder how many days in a row I can eat frozen jalapeno poppers for lunch before it needs to be addressed. All four cats in my Feline Foreign Language school have refused to make any progress learning French. I refresh my Google search for coronavirus news for the 19th time today. Virginia K-12 schools closed for the remainder of the school year. Olympics postponed. Three week lockdown in South Africa. More charts showing the impact of COVID-19. That’s enough news for now. I’ll check again in an hour. Or sooner. During this unprecedented time, it’s way too easy to check the news. I’m here at home on my computer and connected to the Internet. All I have to do is refresh a search or type in “coronavirus,” and I have access to global news and information about the pandemic. If I walk into the living room and turn on a 24-hour news network, I can consume COVID-19 related content all day. It feels good, for a little, to see what’s going on in the US and the world. But for many of us, constantly checking the news can create or worsen feelings of stress and anxiety. How long will this last? When will things return to normal? Will we all have jobs in eight weeks? It’s best to limit your consumption of news during this ti...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health America Publishers coronavirus COVID-19 News quarantine Source Type: blogs

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Source: L Encephale - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Encephale Source Type: research
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Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
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Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
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