Anesthesia Implications of Patient Use of Electronic Cigarettes.

Anesthesia Implications of Patient Use of Electronic Cigarettes. AANA J. 2020 Apr;88(2):135-140 Authors: Harris DE, Foley EM Abstract Electronic cigarettes are essentially electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). Use of ENDS has increased sharply in the United States in recent years, particularly among youth. We reviewed the literature on ENDS use, based on a PubMed search, with a focus on effects that could influence anesthetic and surgical outcomes. We also included a meta-analysis of articles published between 2016 and 2018 reporting injuries from exploding ENDS. These devices deliver nicotine, which is addictive and a cardiac stimulant. The nicotine in ENDS has been linked to increased risk of heart disease and myocardial infarction. Also, ENDS deliver vapors of solvents, flavorings, and other chemicals that can cause chronic and acute respiratory diseases. Furthermore, ENDS use may pose a cancer risk. However, ENDS are somewhat less dangerous than cigarettes and are used as smoking cessation devices. From the literature review, we identified 15 articles reporting injuries from ENDS fires and explosions to 93 patients. Most of these patients were young (mean age = 31.6 years) and male (91%). The most common injury sites were the thigh (62%) and hand (33%). Because the anesthetist will likely encounter increasing numbers of ENDS users in the future, it is important to identify these patients and to understand the risks of ENDS use. PMID: 3223...
Source: AANA Journal - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: AANA J Source Type: research

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Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
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Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
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