Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis without asthma or cystic fibrosis.

Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis without asthma or cystic fibrosis. Paediatr Int Child Health. 2020 Apr 02;:1-3 Authors: Kaur P, Kumar P, Randev S, Guglani V Abstract Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is an immunological disease complicating asthma or cystic fibrosis. An 8-year-old girl with no previous respiratory morbidity was diagnosed with ABPA on the basis of a raised eosinophil count and total and specific serum IgE levels combined with a positive skin-prick test for aspergillus and typical CT images of finger-in-glove hilar opacities and hyperattenuating mucous. She responded to treatment with itraconazole and corticosteroids and remains well. As far as we are aware, she is only the second child to be diagnosed with ABPA without asthma or cystic fibrosis. PMID: 32238049 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Paediatrics and international child health - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Paediatr Int Child Health Source Type: research

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Purpose of review Aspergillus spp. cause a clinical spectrum of disease with severity of disease dependent on degree of immune compromise, nature and intensity of inflammatory host response, and/or underlying lung disease. Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis encompasses a spectrum of diseases including aspergilloma, Aspergillus nodules, chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis, chronic fibrosing pulmonary aspergillosis, and subacute invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) paradoxically is an immune hypersensitivity manifestation in the lungs that almost always occurs in the setting of...
Source: Current Opinion in Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Tags: PULMONOLOGY: Edited by David N. Cornfield Source Type: research
Aspergillus spp. is a ubiquitous mold found commonly in our environment that can cause a spectrum of pulmonary disorders ranging from a hypersensitivity reaction to an acutely invasive disease with significant mortality. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis results from airway hypersensitivity from aspergillus colonization almost exclusively in patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis. Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis typically present in immunocompetent patients with underlying lung pathology.
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Nurhayat Yakut, Eda Kepenekli Kadayifci, Ela Erdem Eralp, Yasemin GokdemirLung India 2020 37(2):161-163 Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is recognized as a rare, progressive, allergic disorder in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and asthma. Treatment of ABPA mainly includes systemic corticosteroids (CSs) and antifungal agents. Here, we report posaconazole treatment in a 9-year-old male child with ABPA and also review the literature on antifungal management of ABPA. The child with CF was admitted to the emergency room with complaints of fever, productive cough, and acute dyspnea. Auscultation of the lungs r...
Source: Lung India - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion: We conclude that basophil and lymphocyte activation tests could enhance the diagnosis of allergic mycosis, compared to usual humoral markers. Further studies with larger cohorts and addressing both mold extracts and mold relevant molecules are needed in order to confirm and extend the application of this personalized medicine approach.
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The use of multiple recombinant antigens may improve the diagnostic accuracy in CF complicated with ABPA or AB. Asp f1 reactivity may relate to the presence of actively growing Aspergillus spp., which might be a useful marker for guiding antifungal therapy in ABPA. PMID: 31090534 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
Aspergillus is the causative agent of human diseases ranging from asthma to invasive infection. Genetic and environmental factors are crucial in regulating the interaction between the host and Aspergillus. The role played by the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1), which catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step of tryptophan catabolism along the kynurenine pathway, is increasingly being recognized, but whether and how genetic variation of IDO1 influences the risk of aspergillosis in susceptible patients is incompletely understood. In addition, whether the closely related protein IDO2 plays a similar role remains ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is an immunologic pulmonary disorder caused by hypersensitivity to Aspergillus fumigatus. This disorder is most commonly seen in patients with poorly controlled asthma and cystic fibrosis. It is rarely reported in chronic granulomatous disease patients; however, there are no cases reported with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the English literature. Herein, we report a patient with chronic granulomatous disease who had hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and subsequently developed allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Hematology Oncology - Category: Hematology Tags: Online Articles: Clinical and Laboratory Observations Source Type: research
In conclusion, a non-negligible proportion of patients with nonspecific alterations of screening tests at baseline may develop Aspergillus-associated syndromes during follow-up. Future studies are needed to confirm our observations.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Respiratory infections Source Type: research
Kana Ram Jat, Pankaj C Vaidya, Joseph L Mathew, Sunil Jondhale, Meenu SinghLung India 2018 35(6):499-507 Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a pulmonary disease caused by Aspergillus induced hypersensitivity. It usually occurs in immunocompetent but susceptible patients with bronchial asthma and cystic fibrosis. If ABPA goes undiagnosed and untreated, it may progress to bronchiectasis and/or pulmonary fibrosis with significant morbidity and mortality. ABPA is a well-recognized entity in adults; however, there is lack of literature in children. The aim of the present review is to summarize pathophysiology, di...
Source: Lung India - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: news
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