Circadian Clock and Sirtuins in Diabetic Lung: A Mechanistic Perspective

Diabetes-induced tissue injuries in target organs such as the kidney, heart, eye, liver, skin, and nervous system contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality of diabetes. However, whether the lung should be considered a diabetic target organ has been discussed for decades. Accumulating evidence shows that both pulmonary histological changes and functional abnormalities have been observed in diabetic patients, suggesting that the lung is a diabetic target organ. Mechanisms underlying diabetic lung are unclear, however, oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, and premature aging convincingly contribute to them. Circadian system and Sirtuins have been well-documented to play important roles in above mechanisms. Circadian rhythms are intrinsic mammalian biological oscillations with a period of near 24 h driven by the circadian clock system. This system plays an important role in the regulation of energy metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, cellular proliferation and senescence, thus impacting metabolism-related diseases, chronic airway diseases and cancers. Sirtuins, a family of adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent histone deacetylases, have been demonstrated to regulate a series of physiological processes and affect diseases such as obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), heart disease, cancer, and aging. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the roles of the circadian clock and Sirtuins in regulating cellular proc...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research

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The coronavirus pandemic has changed a lot about modern American life: how we work, socialize, and even how we eat. Dining out is a distant memory. But nutritionally, people weren’t exactly thriving in pre-pandemic America. “Before COVID-19 came along, it was increasingly clear that the diet quality and nutritional status of Americans was terrible,” says Dr. Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. More than 40% of U.S. adults are obese. After years of declines, heart disease death rates are on the rise again. So are rates of obesity-linked canc...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Authors: Das UN Abstract Our own studies and those of others have shown that defects in essential fatty acid (EFA) metabolism occurs in age-related disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, immune dysfunction and cancer. It has been noted that in all these disorders there could occur a defect in the activities of desaturases, cyclo-oxygenase (COX), and lipoxygenase (LOX) enzymes leading to a decrease in the formation of their long-chain products gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Health Heart Health Surgery Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Acupuncture in Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Med Acupunct Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Aging Healthy Eating Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
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Source: British Journal of Hospital Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Br J Hosp Med (Lond) Source Type: research
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Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Open bowel flora carbohydrates carbs Inflammation NAFLD nash triglycerides undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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