Preparing for Ebola, Then Coronavirus

By Katherine Seaton, Editorial OfficerApril 02, 2020Midwife Ester (pictured below, screening a client for COVID-19) is used to waking up every morning and going to work at the Rwamagana Provincial Hospital in Rwanda to care for mothers and babies there. But in the last few weeks, circumstances have changed her daily work routine. Now, she identifies and investigates suspected COVID-19 cases, conducting screenings for everyone who enters the hospital.“I’m not scared of COVID-19,” she says.“I am just happy I am contributing to saving lives.’’ Rwanda declared its first case of coronavirus on March 14, 2020, and over 100 health workers (and counting) are now organizing to prevent, detect, and respond to COVID-19, helping to identify and investigate suspected cases at health facilities. As of April 1, 2020, Rwanda had75 confirmed cases of COVID-19.But this is not Rwanda’s first time responding to a deadly communicable disease. The country shares one of the busiest border crossings in the world with the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), which announced on March 3 that itno longer had any cases of Ebola—an enormous milestone for the DRC, which had been tackling the second-deadliest outbreak of Ebola in history.Now those strong health systems and planning skills are helping both countries respond to COVID-19. Rwanda and DRC already havedisease response plans in place to help mitigate the spread of this new and hi...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Infectious Diseases Health Workers Midwives Nurses Source Type: news

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Discussions with the FDA are ongoing to define the required data set for filing Janssen’s Ebola vaccine regimen under the FDA’s Animal Rule licensure pathway. About Janssen’s Ebola Vaccine Regimen The Janssen investigational preventive Ebola vaccine regimen (Ad26.ZEBOV, MVA-BN-Filo) utilizes a viral vector strategy in which viruses – in this case adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) – are genetically modified so that they cannot replicate in human cells. In addition, these vectors are modified to safely carry the genetic code of an Ebola virus protein in order...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news
Drug pioneered for Ebola to be used in UK under emergency medicines provisionCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA drug that reduces recovery time from Covid-19 will be made available to a number of NHS patients in “probably the biggest step forward in the treatment of coronavirus” since the pandemic began, the UK health secretary has said.Matt Hancock on Tuesday welcomed the authorisation of the experimental antiviral drug remdesivir, which has been shown to reduce recovery time for patients in hospital with Covid-19 from 15 days to 11 days.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak UK news Drugs NHS UCL (University College London) London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science US news China World news Source Type: news
By Carol Bales , Advocacy and policy communications manager, IntraHealth International ; Casey Bishopp, Communications officer, IntraHealth InternationalMay 22, 2020Here in North Carolina, we all know someone who works in health care. Maybe there’s a nurse in your family, a physician, a data clerk, a pharmacist.These“frontline health workers” are in the spotlight right now as they face unprecedented dangers during every shift they work.Frontline health workers are literally putting themselves on the line—at great personal risk—to respond to COVID-19, stop its spread, and save their patient...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Infectious Diseases COVID-19 Advocacy Health Workers Source Type: news
This study showed that a five-day regimen is as effective as 10 days–that’s important, doctors say, since it could mean shorter stays in the hospital, which could alleviate some of the burden on the health care system. “Of course we will have to wait for the final review of all the data, but it would be very nice to have an anti-viral that’s efficacious in this terrible illness,” says Dr. Aruna Subramanian, a clinical professor of medicine at Stanford and an investigator on the study. “At least we know that we can help patients with this, and that’s really the bottom line.” T...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
Patients lie motionless in a hospital ICU ward, as doctors hurry around their beds. The patients’ faces are concealed by ventilators; the doctors’ by masks. The death rate is rising so quickly that doctors can no longer keep count. “The beds don’t even have time to cool before they are taken up by other patients,” says ICU nurse Cristina Pilati. Yet over the sound of stretchers rolling and monitors beeping, Pilati starts singing the lyrics of ‘Angel’ as she cares for a teenage boy in the ICU. ‘Spend all your time waiting, for that second chance,’ she sings. ‘For a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news
Many of the people I support in Kinshasa have no money, no soap, no water – and when they are struggling to breathe, no ventilatorsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWe ’re used to emergencies and people dying in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, whether it’s a result of the long-runningconflict or Ebola, cholera and malaria. But coronavirus has knocked us for six, because it has affected people we are very close to.I ’ve been working in development for decades, but I have to admit I have shed tears these past few weeks.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Global development Democratic Republic of the Congo Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science World news Africa Source Type: news
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post COVID-19 Has Blown Away the Myth About ‘First’ and ‘Third’ World Competence appeared first on Inter Press Service.
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health Coronavirus Source Type: news
SG Patricia Scotland and President Kagame of Rwanda last year during the annual commemoration of the genocide against the Tutsis. Credit: The Commonwealth SecretariatBy William EllisTORONTO, May 13 2020 (IPS) The Coronovirus pandemic has been an unforgiving test of advanced economies. Health systems in the United States, France, Italy, Spain, and the UK have been put under immense pressure, with shortages of doctors, ventilators, personal protective equipment and the capacity to test for the virus. Their economies have been battered and the consequences are spoken of in terms of the Great Depression. Hope may have emerged...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Economy & Trade Featured Financial Crisis Global Globalisation Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Peter Piot tells of his brush with death and predicts people will suffer effects of the virus for yearsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coveragePeter Piot, the scientist who helped discover the Ebola virus, and the director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, has told of his brush with death after contracting Covid-19.The professor had never previously been seriously ill, but after 40 years studying and leading the global response to infectious diseases including HIV and Aids, he said that “finally, a virus got me”.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Global development Global health Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Science London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Ebola World news UK news Source Type: news
An infectious outbreak can conclude in more ways than one, historians say. But for whom does it end, and who gets to decide?
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Plague Smallpox Ebola Virus Influenza Epidemic (1918-19) Rats Antibiotics Bubonic Plague Fleas Microbiology Deaths (Fatalities) Vaccination and Immunization your-feed-science your-feed-health Source Type: news
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