Covid-19 Changed How the World Does Science, Together

Never before, scientists say, have so many of the world ’s researchers focused so urgently on a single topic. Nearly all other research has ground to a halt.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Research Clinical Trials Laboratories and Scientific Equipment Vaccination and Immunization Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Science and Technology Academic and Scientific Journals Epidemics Politics and Government Source Type: news

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Conclusion: The T-cell epitope-based peptide vaccine was designed for COVID-19 using the envelope protein as an immunogenic target. Nevertheless, the proposed vaccine rapidly needs to be validated clinically in order to ensure its safety and immunogenic profile to help stop this epidemic before it leads to devastating global outbreaks. PMID: 32461973 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
Discussions with the FDA are ongoing to define the required data set for filing Janssen’s Ebola vaccine regimen under the FDA’s Animal Rule licensure pathway. About Janssen’s Ebola Vaccine Regimen The Janssen investigational preventive Ebola vaccine regimen (Ad26.ZEBOV, MVA-BN-Filo) utilizes a viral vector strategy in which viruses – in this case adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) – are genetically modified so that they cannot replicate in human cells. In addition, these vectors are modified to safely carry the genetic code of an Ebola virus protein in order...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news
Conclusions: The outbreak of the epidemic could promote coronavirus research, meanwhile, coronavirus research contributes to overcoming the epidemic. Attention should be drawn to the latest popular research, including “Spike protein,” “Receptor binding domain,” and “Vaccine.” Therefore, more and more efforts will be put into mechanism research and vaccine research and development, which can be helpful to deal with the epidemic.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Source Type: research
As nations around the world scramble to bring coronavirus outbreaks under control, Dr. Raj Panjabi is worried that the world’s poor populations will be excluded from accessing treatments and prevention measures, a scenario he calls “viral apartheid.” “I don’t use that term lightly,” said Panjabi, speaking with TIME Senior Writer Alice Park during a TIME 100 Talks discussion on May 28. “The idea that a group of people—whether it’s the vaccines, the test or treatments—will get access to those vital life-saving tools, and that those will likely be the rich nations an...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME100 Talks Source Type: news
As nations around the world scramble to bring coronavirus outbreaks under control, Dr. Raj Panjabi is worried that the world’s poor populations will be excluded from accessing treatments and prevention measures, a scenario he calls “viral apartheid.” “I don’t use that term lightly,” said Panjabi, speaking with TIME Senior Writer Alice Park during a TIME 100 Talks discussion on May 28. “The idea that a group of people—whether it’s the vaccines, the test or treatments—will get access to those vital life-saving tools, and that those will likely be the rich nations an...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME100 Talks Source Type: news
Conclusions: international cooperation is an important way to accelerate research progress and achieve success. Developing corresponding vaccines and drugs are the current hotspots and research directions.
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
The global novel coronavirus pandemic afflicting everyone is showing mixed signs of activity. In some countries it appears to be easing, while in others it appears to be experiencing a resurgence. It’s not at all clear when the pandemic will end, but it’s unlikely to do so before 2021. What has become increasingly clear is that the toll of the pandemic will impact more than the people who come down with COVID-19. The mental health impact of living with a pandemic is being mostly ignored — for now. But as the deaths continue to rise, we need to pay close attention to the cost of the pandemic’s reperc...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy coronavirus COVID-19 Source Type: blogs
It ’s worth reflecting on the biologic brilliance of the technique and on what our bodies and immune systems are capable of doing, when appropriately prompted.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Smallpox Vaccination and Immunization Epidemics Immune System Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Source Type: news
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
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