Patient-Related Risk Factors for Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: A Systematic Review

The objective of this study was to analyze those risk factors of CINV through a systematic literature review.MethodsWe searched MEDLINE to identify articles that addressed patient-related risk factors of CINV through clinical studies.ResultsA total of 49 articles were selected for this study. A total of 28 patient-related risk-factors that significantly impact the risk of CINV were documented. Three factors are demographically related, 17 factors are intrinsic in nature and innate to patient's physiology or influenced by physiology, and eight factors are extrinsic in nature. At least five studies identified seven risk factors with notable summary odds ratio: history of nausea/vomiting (odds ratio: 3.13, 95% CI 2.40–4.07, p
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

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ConclusionSymptoms of polyneuropathy following adjuvant docetaxel and oxaliplatin persist 5  years after treatment and affect quality of life negatively.
Source: Cancer Medicine - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
What is Vicodin and What Does It Do? According to MedicineNet, Vicodin is a combination of Hydrocodone and Acetaminophen. Hydrocodone is a narcotic pain-reliever and a cough suppressant, similar to codeine. Hydrocodone blocks the receptors on nerve cells in the brain that give rise to the sensation of pain. Acetaminophen is a non-narcotic pain reliever and fever reducer. Acetaminophen works by elevating the threshold to pain. Essentially, in order for pain to be felt, s greater stimulation of the nerves responsible for the sensation of pain is necessary. It reduces fever through its action on the temperature-regulating ce...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment anxiety in withdrawal vicodin withdrawal symptoms Source Type: blogs
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)A Series of Observations on Opioids By a Palliative Doc Who Prescribes A Lot of Opioids But Also Has Questions.This is the 5th post in a series about opioids, with a focus on how my thinking about opioids has changed over the years. See also:Part 1 – Introduction, General Disclaimers, Hand-Wringing, and a Hand-Crafted Graph.Part 2 – We Were Wrong 20 years Ago, Our Current Response to the Opioid Crisis is Wrong, But We Should Still Be Helping Most of our Long-Term Patients Reduce Their Opioid DosesPart 3 – Opioids Have Ceiling Effects, High-Doses are Rarely Therapeutic, and Ano...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: cancer opioids pain rosielle The profession Source Type: blogs
You might have seen it in your neighborhood health store, your local spa or your corner coffee shop. CBD, aka cannabidiol, is getting mixed into cocktails, lotions and drinks. But what is CBD, exactly? Does it have real health benefits? Is it even safe? To get a better understanding of the compound, TIME spoke to two scientists on the cutting edge of CBD research: Dr. Esther Blessing, an associate professor of psychiatry at New York University, and Margaret Haney, professor of neurobiology at Columbia University Medical Center and director of the university’s Marijuana Research Laboratory. Blessing and Haney agree th...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news
Introduction: Approximately 1.5% of population will be diagnosed with leukemia in their lifetime (SEER Cancer Statistics Review). Diagnosis of acute leukemia has an overwhelming effect on the patient and their families. Besides the diagnosis, effect of chemotherapeutic agents and agony over the ultimate outcome can also affect emotional-behavioral wellbeing. Evolution of depression as a disorder, along the course of acute leukemia has been reported in the past (David et al Procedia Soc &Behav Sci 2014). We investigated the prevalence of mental health disorders in hospitalized patients admitted with acute leukemia diagn...
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: 904. Outcomes Research-Malignant Conditions: Poster III Source Type: research
Discussion Flushing is usually thought of as a benign condition such as blushing, but can be quite irritating if it is frequent or persistent (i.e. menopausal hot flashes) or even pathologic (i.e. malignancy). “Flushing is a subjective and sensation of warmth that is accompanied by reddening of the skin anywhere on the body but favors the face, neck, and upper torso…. Flushing can be broadly divided into episodic or persistent. Episodic flashing is mediated by the release of endogenous vasoactive mediators or medications, while persistent flushing result in a fixed facial erythema with telangiectasias and cyan...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Publication date: 2017 Source:International Review of Neurobiology, Volume 136 Author(s): Jesse R. Schank, Markus Heilig Substance P (SP) is an 11-amino acid neuropeptide of the tachykinin family that preferentially activates the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R). First isolated 85 years ago and sequenced 40 years later, SP has been extensively studied. Early studies identified a role for SP and the NK1R in contraction of intestinal smooth muscle, central pain processing, and neurogenic inflammation. An FDA-approved NK1R antagonist, aprepitant, is used clinically for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea, as the NK1R in...
Source: International Review of Neurobiology - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 August 2017 Source:International Review of Neurobiology Author(s): Jesse R. Schank, Markus Heilig Substance P (SP) is an 11-amino acid neuropeptide of the tachykinin family that preferentially activates the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R). First isolated 85 years ago and sequenced 40 years later, SP has been extensively studied. Early studies identified a role for SP and the NK1R in contraction of intestinal smooth muscle, central pain processing, and neurogenic inflammation. An FDA-approved NK1R antagonist, aprepitant, is used clinically for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea,...
Source: International Review of Neurobiology - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Medical marijuana was legalized in Maryland two years ago, and this summer we will be getting our first dispensaries.  Psychiatrists are starting to ask what this means in terms of treating patients.  Roy did a great job summing up some of the research for our colleagues:Unfortunately, because of the many historical restrictions on research, there is increasing amounts of data available, yet few "facts" to go by ("fact" as in "a thing that is indisputably the case"). These data are often viewed from differing perspectives. Such as absolute vs relative risks. Harm reduction vs harm av...
Source: Shrink Rap - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: blogs
Marijuana has proved to be a powerful aid in easing chronic pain and helping battle nausea, but results are mixed or largely inconclusive on other health benefits, as well as detriments, according to a massive new scientific review of cannabis studies. The report, released Thursday by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, analyzes an astounding 10,000 scientific studies on the drug. “The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research” concludes that marijuana definitely provides some health benefits, though other claims ab...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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