Food Allergy Insights: A Changing Landscape

AbstractThe panorama of food allergies (FA) has changed profoundly in recent years. In light of recent advances in knowledge of pathogenetic mechanisms and a greater attention to the multifaceted range of possible clinical manifestations, there is a need for a critical review of past classifications. Changes in nutrition, environment and lifestyles around the world are modifying the global FA epidemiology and new FA phenotypes are also emerging. Furthermore, both biotechnological advances in this field and recent personalized therapies have improved the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to FA. Consequently, both the prevention and clinical management of FA are rapidly changing and new therapeutic strategies are emerging, even revolutionizing the current medical practice. Given the significant increase in the prevalence of FA in recent years, the objective of this review is to provide an updated and complete overview of current knowledge in its etiopathogenesis, diagnostics and therapy, useful not only for a better understanding of this frequent and complex pathology but also for practical guidance in its clinical management.
Source: Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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