Predictors of Primary Graft Dysfunction Following Bilateral Lung Transplantation

Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is the leading cause of early morbidity and mortality following lung transplantation, affecting up to 30% of recipients within 72 hours of transplantation1. Published perioperative risk factors include a history of donor smoking2,3 or heavy donor alcohol use4, longer graft ischemic times2, volume of intraoperative fluid administered5, and higher recipient BMI2,3,6. Our aim was to identify additional intraoperative risk factors for PGD after lung transplantation.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (811) Source Type: research

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This study provides direct evidence for the contribution of gut microbiota to the cognitive decline during normal aging and suggests that restoring microbiota homeostasis in the elderly may improve cognitive function. On Nutraceutical Senolytics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/05/on-nutraceutical-senolytics/ Nutraceuticals are compounds derived from foods, usually plants. In principle one can find useful therapies in the natural world, taking the approach of identifying interesting molecules and refining them to a greater potency than naturally occurs in order to produce a usefully large therape...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The objective is to start treating chronic diseases from the root and not the symptoms of the disease. As we are starting to enroll patients in "senolytics-clinical trials," it will be imperative to assess if senolysis efficiently targets the primary cause of disease or if it works best in combination with other drugs. Additional basic science research is required to address the fundamental role of senescent cells, especially in the established contexts of disease. Notes on Self-Experimentation with Sex Steroid Ablation for Regrowth of the Thymus https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/04/notes-on-se...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We sought to better characterize differences in transplant outcomes between patients with alcoholic cardiomyopathy and those with other forms of cardiomyopathy in a national cohort.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (548) Source Type: research
This study provides strong evidence that following a healthy lifestyle can substantially extend the years a person lives disease-free." Commentary on Recent Evidence for Cognitive Decline to Precede Amyloid Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/commentary-on-recent-evidence-for-cognitive-decline-to-precede-amyloid-aggregation-in-alzheimers-disease/ I can't say that I think the data presented in the research noted here merits quite the degree of the attention that it has been given in the popular science press. It is interesting, but not compelling if its role...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Background: Liver transplantation (LT) surgery poses a significant cardiovascular (CV) risk. Given the rising prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and advancing age of LT candidates, delineating CV risk is increasingly important. We sought to characterize the incidence and modes of intraoperative and early ( ≤30days) CV death post-LT.
Source: Heart, Lung and Circulation - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: 425 Source Type: research
This study shows that mRNA levels of the aging related lamin A splice variant progerin, associated with premature aging in HGPS, were significantly upregulated in subjects with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Moreover, our data revealed a significantly positive correlation of BMI with progerin mRNA. These data provide to our knowledge for the first-time evidence for a possible involvement of progerin in previously observed accelerated aging of overweight and obese individuals potentially limiting their longevity. Our results also showed that progerin mRNA was positively correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP). This might suggest an as...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Geng-Hong Xia1†, Chao You1,2†, Xu-Xuan Gao1, Xiu-Li Zeng1, Jia-Jia Zhu1, Kai-Yu Xu3, Chu-Hong Tan1, Ruo-Ting Xu1, Qi-Heng Wu1, Hong-Wei Zhou3, Yan He4*‡ and Jia Yin1*‡ 1Department of Neurology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China 2Department of Neurology, The First People's Hospital of Zunyi, Zunyi, China 3State Key Laboratory of Organ Failure Research, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China 4Microbiome Medicine Center, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical Univ...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
It’s hardly news that the gastrointestinal tract is important to human health: It transports food from the mouth to the stomach, converts it into absorbable nutrients and stored energy, and shuttles waste back out of the body. If you don’t properly nourish yourself, you don’t live. It’s that simple. But in recent years, scientists have discovered that the GI system has an even bigger, more complex job than previously appreciated. It’s been linked to numerous aspects of health that have seemingly nothing to do with digestion, from immunity to emotional stress to chronic illnesses, including can...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
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