The COVID-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic: consequences for occupational health

We live in unprecedented modern times experiencing how an outbreak of a particular viral disease, COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, also commonly referred to as the Coronavirus, is disrupting societies and personal lives. The virus is likely to spread to most, if not all, countries, illustrating the interconnectedness of the world. At the time of writing, Italy and Spain have become the epicenters in terms of fatalities in Europe, whereas the United States has recorded the most diagnosed cases worldwide. While many national measures to contain, suppress, mitigate, or delay the spread of the virus are being taken, there is great uncertainty as to which measures are appropriate or not, varying from instructions of stringent hand hygiene; travel restrictions; social distancing; and closure of schools, restaurants, bars and shops to a complete lock down of large parts of society. Science-based evidence informing the policy about the efficaciousness and possible adverse effects of these measures are urgently needed. As there is a lack of both data and insight into the mechanisms of the pandemic, generating this science-based evidence will take some time. Key epidemiological numbers, such as the attack rate of the disease and the infection –hospitalization and infection–fatality ratios, are not yet available, and estimates based on the existing limited data come with huge uncertainties (1, 2). Thus, scientists blindfolded by the lack of data have to inform a policy that n...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 2 June 2020Source: Life SciencesAuthor(s): Fereshteh Yazdanpanah, Michael R. Hamblin, Nima Rezaei
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Publication date: 1 September 2020Source: Life Sciences, Volume 256Author(s): Fedor Simko, Russel J. Reiter
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Opiate analgesia can disrupt performance on the Westmead PTA scale in school-aged children resulting in a high false-positive error rate. It is therefore important to record pain medication schedules and interpret results cautiously when opiate analgesia is used following a TBI. Alteration of the method of administration of the memory items should be researched as this may increase the validity of the scale for children with TBI treated with opiate analgesics. PMID: 32497441 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Brain Injury - Category: Neurology Tags: Brain Inj Source Type: research
Authors: Frost DW, Shah R, Melvin L, Galán de Juana M, MacMillan TE, Abdelhalim T, Lai A, Rawal S, Cavalcanti RB PMID: 32493744 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Canadian Medical Association Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: CMAJ Source Type: research
Authors: Jones E PMID: 32493743 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Canadian Medical Association Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: CMAJ Source Type: research
Authors: Boodman C, Lagacé-Wiens P, Bullard J PMID: 32493742 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Canadian Medical Association Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: CMAJ Source Type: research
Authors: Mishra S, Kwong JC, Chan AK, Baral SD PMID: 32493741 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Canadian Medical Association Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: CMAJ Source Type: research
Authors: Liu W, Zhou P, Chen K, Ye Z, Liu F, Li X, He N, Wu Z, Zhang Q, Gong X, Tang Q, Du X, Ying Y, Xu X, Zhang Y, Liu J, Li Y, Shen N, Couban RJ, Ibrahim QI, Guyatt G, Zhai S Abstract BACKGROUND: Antiviral medications are being given empirically to some patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). To support the development of a COVID-19 management guideline, we conducted a systematic review that addressed the benefits and harms of 7 antiviral treatments for COVID-19. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed and 3 Chinese databases (CNKI, WA...
Source: Canadian Medical Association Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: CMAJ Source Type: research
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