Coronavirus epidemic 'far from over' in Asia-Pacific, WHO warns

Every country needs to keep preparing for large-scale community transmission, says regional directorCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe coronavirus epidemic is “far from over” in the Asia-Pacific region, and current measures to curb the spread of the virus are buying time for countries to prepare for large-scale community transmissions, a WHO official has said.Even with all the measures, the risk of transmission in the region will not go away as long as the pandemic continues, said Takeshi Kasai, regional director for the western Pacific at the World Health Organization.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science World news US news China Asia Pacific Medical research World Bank Global economy Business Source Type: news

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ConclusionsCOOPERA is the first real-time system being used to monitor trends in COVID-19 in Japan, and provides useful insights to assist political decisions to tackle the epidemic. PMID: 32475884 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Tags: J Epidemiol Source Type: research
The recent outbreak of the coronavirus SARS-COV-2 has led to a worldwide pandemic (Cucinotta and Vanelli, 2020) with substantial social, health and economic costs (UN News, 2020). The epidemic spread quickly from Wuhan to the neighbouring cities and then to the rest of China (Wu et al., 2020), possibly exacerbated by the ‘travel rush’ for the Lunar New Year. On 23rd January 2020, the Chinese government initiated an unprecedented move of introducing a ‘metropolitan-wide quarantine’ of the city of Wuhan, by terminating all public transportation in the city and intercity links (Chen et al., 2020, Zhang Lei et a l., 2020).
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Every time she has to buy groceries lately, Lily Marquez gets worried. She lives in a two-bedroom apartment in San Francisco with her two young children, her husband, her chronically ill mother-in-law, and her husband’s grandmother. Both of the older women are at high-risk of becoming severely ill if they get COVID-19, and she doesn’t want to be the one to infect them. But while many Americans have switched to online grocery shopping to avoid crowded spaces during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, that’s not an option for Marquez—or the millions of other low-income women and children who rely on th...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
When Eric Freeland, 34, started coughing at the end of March, he didn’t think much of it. But when his symptoms grew worse, Freeland’s mother began to worry. Freeland is a Native American living with his family in the Navajo Nation in the southwestern U.S., where access to healthcare is limited. He is also diabetic, putting him at greater risk to the coronavirus. When Freeland’s breathing became short and stuttered, his mother drove him to the nearest hospital where within minutes of arriving, he lost consciousness. He awoke three weeks later, hooked up to a ventilator, from a medically induced coma. &l...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news
Discussions with the FDA are ongoing to define the required data set for filing Janssen’s Ebola vaccine regimen under the FDA’s Animal Rule licensure pathway. About Janssen’s Ebola Vaccine Regimen The Janssen investigational preventive Ebola vaccine regimen (Ad26.ZEBOV, MVA-BN-Filo) utilizes a viral vector strategy in which viruses – in this case adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) – are genetically modified so that they cannot replicate in human cells. In addition, these vectors are modified to safely carry the genetic code of an Ebola virus protein in order...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news
THE CORONAVIRUS DISEASE 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak that spread from Wuhan, China, in December 2019 became a global pandemic within about 2 months, causing more than 330,000 deaths worldwide so far (at the time of writing).1 This has forced hospitals in the most affected countries and regions around the world to rearrange their activity, creating new spaces and pathways while reducing nonurgent admissions and health services.2 Although only a minority of patients infected with the new severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) develop symptoms severe enough to require intensive care unit (ICU) admission,3 th...
Source: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
As nations around the world scramble to bring coronavirus outbreaks under control, Dr. Raj Panjabi is worried that the world’s poor populations will be excluded from accessing treatments and prevention measures, a scenario he calls “viral apartheid.” “I don’t use that term lightly,” said Panjabi, speaking with TIME Senior Writer Alice Park during a TIME 100 Talks discussion on May 28. “The idea that a group of people—whether it’s the vaccines, the test or treatments—will get access to those vital life-saving tools, and that those will likely be the rich nations an...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME100 Talks Source Type: news
As nations around the world scramble to bring coronavirus outbreaks under control, Dr. Raj Panjabi is worried that the world’s poor populations will be excluded from accessing treatments and prevention measures, a scenario he calls “viral apartheid.” “I don’t use that term lightly,” said Panjabi, speaking with TIME Senior Writer Alice Park during a TIME 100 Talks discussion on May 28. “The idea that a group of people—whether it’s the vaccines, the test or treatments—will get access to those vital life-saving tools, and that those will likely be the rich nations an...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME100 Talks Source Type: news
COVID-19 is caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (Cov)-2, an enveloped virus with a positive-polarity, single-stranded RNA genome. The initial outbreak of the pandemic began in December 2019, and it is affecting the human health of the global community. In common with previous pandemics (Influenza H1N1 and SARS-CoV) and the epidemics of Middle east respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV, CoVs target bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells. Virus protein ligands (e.g., haemagglutinin or trimeric spike glycoprotein for Influenza and CoV, respectively) interact with cellular receptors, such as (dependin...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Yehua Shen, Chien-shan Cheng, Peng Wang, Xu Zhu, Guangyan Lei, Yong Fang, Hailiang Li, Weijun Fan, Hongming Pan, Zhe Tang, Kuansheng Ma, Xiaoguang Li, Zhengyu Lin, Yiping Zhuang, Xin Ye, Bo Zhai, Yue Han, Jinhua Huang, Huixiong Xu, Rongqin Zheng, Rufu Chen, Jie Yu, Dong Xu, Zhongmin Wang, Zhiqiang MengJournal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2020 16(2):350-355 The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global pandemic since its outbreak in December 2019, which posed a threat to the safety and well-being of people on a global scale. Cancer patients are at high risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavi...
Source: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
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