Associations between menopausal hormone therapy and sleep disturbance in women during the menopausal transition and post-menopause: data from the Norwegian prescription database and the HUNT study

Impaired sleep is common in menopausal women. The aim was to examine associations between uses of systemic menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) and sleep disturbance in a large population sample.
Source: BMC Women's Health - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research

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Abstract Increasing numbers of women experience early menopause due in part to surgical treatment for benign gynecologic disorders and the rise in risk-reducing bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy in women with BRCA mutations. Unfortunately, the adverse health consequences of early loss of ovarian function accelerate the menopausal state and affect multiple systems, including cardiovascular, neurologic, bone, and connective tissue, and affect quality of life owing to vasomotor symptoms, mood, sleep, and sexual function. Yet many clinicians and women remain reluctant to use hormone therapy because of the Women's Health...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Hormone replacement therapy may slightly improve overall survival in women who have undergone surgical treatment for EOC, but the certainty of the evidence is low. HRT may make little or no difference to quality of life, incidence of breast cancer, TIA, CVA and MI as the certainty of the evidence has been assessed as very low. There may be little or no effect of HRT use on progression-free survival. The evidence in this review is limited by imprecision and incompleteness of reported relevant outcomes and therefore the results should be interpreted with caution. Future well-designed RCTs are required as this is...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Sleep disturbances such as insomnia are extremely common, especially in women after menopause. According to data from the National Institutes of Health, sleep disturbance varies from 16% to 42% before menopause, from 39% to 47% during perimenopause, and from 35% to 60% after menopause. Insomnia is a serious medical problem defined by frequent difficulty falling or staying asleep that impacts a person’s life in a negative way. Hormone changes around menopause can lead to sleep problems for many reasons, including changing sleep requirements, increased irritability, and hot flashes. What menopausal women eat could have...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Food as medicine Healthy Eating Menopause Nutrition Sleep Source Type: blogs
In the middle of the night, I wake up feeling warm. I open the window and pull my hair back into a ponytail and drink some water. Then I glance at my phone, delete a few things, and see some spam. I hit unsubscribe and go back to bed. Then I lie there thinking, What if by opening that spam email I got myself hacked? What if I just sent everyone in my contact list a Burger King ad at two in the morning? Now wide awake, I move on to other concerns: my parents’ health, my stepson’s college tuition, pending deadlines. Hours roll by. I tackle real-life math problems: how many weeks I have before getting my next free...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Gen X healthy sleep insomnia Source Type: news
Conclusions: We extend existing research by demonstrating that hormone therapy (HT) in subjective sleep cannot be fully explained by improvements in VMS bother or depressive symptoms. Research to examine the mechanism (s) underlying HT's effects on sleep would have public health significance for perimenopausal women and also advance our general understanding of the pathophysiology of impaired sleep.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research
Authors: Li C, Wang L, Sun X, Yang X Abstract A large number of menopausal women report sleep disturbances along with psychological, somatic and urogenital menopausal symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) in improving subjective sleep quality and the severity of menopausal symptoms. An institutional ethics committee approved this retrospective chart review of 342 women treated with MHT for menopausal symptoms. Standard 28-day MHT consisted of the oral administration of 2 mg estradiol daily for 14 days, followed by 2 mg estradiol and 10 mg dydrogesterone da...
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: Exp Ther Med Source Type: research
ConclusionFurther studies are needed to elucidate the nature of the association between menopause, sleep and persistent pain syndromes, such as FM, showing the role of hormone therapy in prospective placebo ‐controlled trials.
Source: International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: REVIEW Source Type: research
Abstract During the menopausal transition, which begins four to six years before cessation of menses, middle-aged women experience a progressive change in ovarian activity and a physiologic deterioration of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis function associated with fluctuating hormone levels. During this transition, women can suffer symptoms related to menopause (such as hot flushes, sleep disturbance, mood changes, memory complaints and vaginal dryness). Neurological symptoms such as sleep disturbance, "brain fog" and mood changes are a major complaint of women transitioning menopause, with a signific...
Source: Medicina (Kaunas) - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Medicina (Kaunas) Source Type: research
Objective: To compare sleep quality and fatigue between women with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) receiving hormone therapy (HT) and women of the same age with preserved ovarian function. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 61 women with POI receiving HT (POI group) and 61 women with preserved ovarian function (control group) who were matched by age (±2 years). The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Chalder Fatigue Scale were used to assess sleep quality and fatigue. Apart from correlation analysis, the Mann-Whitney, chi-square, or Fisher test was used to compare the groups. Results: W...
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Conclusions: Low-dose paroxetine is an effective treatment for vasomotor menopause symptoms, including hot flushes. PMID: 31480427 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medicina (Kaunas) - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Medicina (Kaunas) Source Type: research
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