New study sheds light on coronavirus infection mechanism

Researchers at the University of Minnesota created a 3D map of the ‘spike’ protein used to latch on to cellsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageNew research has shed light on a crucial biological mechanism that may have helped the coronavirus to infect humans and spread rapidly around the world.A detailed analysis of the virus ’s structure shows that the club-like “spikes” that it uses to establish infections latch on to human cells about four times more strongly than those on the related Sars coronavirus, which killed hundreds of people in a 2002 epidemic.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Medical research Infectious diseases Science Health Microbiology World news Immunology Biochemistry and molecular biology US news Source Type: news

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Conclusions: Preliminary data for PIBD patients during COVID-19 outbreak are reassuring. Standard IBD treatments including biologics should continue at present through the pandemic, especially in children who generally have more severe IBD course on one hand, and milder SARS-CoV-2 infection on the other.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Special Features Source Type: research
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
Conclusion In 1919 George A. Soper1 wrote that the deadly Spanish Flu pandemic that swept around the earth was without any precedents, and that there had been no such catastrophe ‘so sudden, so devastating and so universal’. He remarked that, “The most astonishing thing about the pandemic was the complete mystery which surrounded it. Nobody seemed to know what the disease was, where it came from or how to stop it. Anxious minds are inquiring today whether another wave of it will come again”. With close to 3 million positive cases and around 0.2 million deaths worldwide, the coronavirus has compelle...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Since December 2019, the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2(SARS-CoV-2)has swept 200 countries and regions worldwide [1] and has become a "Public Health Emergency of International Concern" (PHEIC). Pregnant women are susceptible to COVID-19 due to the changes in their physiology and the adaptability of their immune system [2]. During the outbreak of COVID-19, prenatal examinations may be postponed, however, delivery cannot be delayed, and the delivery room should work as usual. During this period, it is particularly important to quickly identify high-risk groups and to provide appropriate protection ...
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract The 2019 coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) continues to expand worldwide. Although the number of cases and the death rate among children and adolescents are reported to be low compared to adults, limited data have been reported. We urgently need to find treatment and vaccine to stop the epidemic. Vaccine development is in progress, but any approved and effective vaccine for COVID-19 is at least 12 to 18 months. The World Health Organization (WHO), the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) have issued instructions and strategies for containing COVID-...
Source: Infectious Disorders Drug Targets - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Infect Disord Drug Targets Source Type: research
Conclusions Testing is important to track the trajectory of an epidemic in a community to guide local or national efforts at mitigationThe tests we currently have for COVID have limited accuracy for the individual patientAntibody testing suggests that the fatality rate for COVID may be low in certain communities, but data from New York suggests there is the potential for significant death and morbidity in any major metropolitan areaContact tracing enabled by smart phone technology is likely unable to be effective because they do not overcome the inherent limitations of COVID testing, require widespread adoption, and may...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Anish Koka COVID-19 testing Source Type: blogs
Patients lie motionless in a hospital ICU ward, as doctors hurry around their beds. The patients’ faces are concealed by ventilators; the doctors’ by masks. The death rate is rising so quickly that doctors can no longer keep count. “The beds don’t even have time to cool before they are taken up by other patients,” says ICU nurse Cristina Pilati. Yet over the sound of stretchers rolling and monitors beeping, Pilati starts singing the lyrics of ‘Angel’ as she cares for a teenage boy in the ICU. ‘Spend all your time waiting, for that second chance,’ she sings. ‘For a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news
One person in Wuhan eats an uncooked bat, and your local Walmart runs out of toilet paper. This is such a surreal scenario, no wonder people are looking for alternative answers to how their normal lives got blown into pieces in the matter of weeks. And while conspiracy theories are usually a marginal phenomenon, in this age of misinformation, these theories seem to take over the place of truth and science. While the truth is usually complex and often hard to understand, these clean-cut conspiracy narratives are designed to prey on pre-established suspicions, so they can seem like viable alternatives. And unfortunately, ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Conspiracy theories Future of Medicine fda drug research coronavirus covid covid19 pandemic plandemic Source Type: blogs
(University of Barcelona) Although the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak was officially presented suddenly in the popular market of exotic and wild animals in Wuhan in December 2019, phylogenetic studies state that coronavirus was already present in latency phase since October in this city in the province of Hubei. During this latency phase, the infection followed its silent course and spread among the population in a stochastic way without showing epidemic signs.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
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