Case of the Week 585

And now for something completely unrelated to COVID-19.For those of you able to get outdoors, keep a look out for these little critters. For those of you stuck inside, you might be happy that you are missing them:Identification?Generously donated by Florida Fan.
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

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CEO of Novalead, told ET that the firm will start phase 3 randomised trials to study whether the generic drug nitazoxanide brings down the viral load of a moderately ill Covid-19 patient, and the time taken for it. The secondary endpoint of the study will be to see if patients are able to get off oxygen support after administration of the drug.
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
In the largest observational study thus far investigating the drug hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19, researchers found little evidence that it helps, and worrying evidence that the medication may cause harm. In a study published May 22 in the journal Lancet, scientists in the U.S. and Switzerland report on an analysis of more than 96,000 people hospitalized with confirmed COVID-19 in 671 hospitals on six continents. Nearly 15,000 patients were treated with one of the following: chloroquine (which is an older version of hydroxychloroquine), hydroxychloroquine, or either of those drugs in combination with an an...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news
In 2020, the South Korean movie Parasite became the only foreign-language film to ever win an Oscar for Best Picture. This historic first mirrors a broader trend towards acceptance and integration of Asian culture in the United States. Yet, despite our innumerable contributions to society, there remains little representation of Asians at the highest levels of government, business, academia, and popular media. Asian Americans are often stereotyped as perpetual foreigners because they are seen as inherently different.
Source: American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractHydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is an old medication for malaria. In addition to handling this parasitic disease, HCQ is also used to treat a number of autoimmune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus when other medications are not effective. Recently a new viral infection (COVID-19) is rocking the entire world so much that it has already taken more than 200,000 lives throughout the world within the last two months and the World Health Organization was forced to declare it as a pandemic on March 11, 2020. Interestingly, some reports indicate that this wonder drug may be also beneficial ...
Source: Journal of NeuroImmune Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
It’s long been known that cell phones can carry a multitude of germs, bacteria, and different forms of fungi. With the arrival of the COVID-19 virus, it begs the question if it too can live on the surface of a phone and subsequently be transmitted to another person.  A compilation of studies from across 24 countries over the past 13 years indicates that it is a very likely possibility.  Although COVID-19 was not included in any of these original studies, the rapid rate at which it has spread throughout the world, and the increased and ever-growing physical attachment that people have to their cell phones, l...
Source: GIDEON blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: News Press Source Type: blogs
(Natural News) Did you know viruses can infect each other? Yes, that’s because they’re parasites. In fact, the largest known virus, named Sputnik, has been discovered by French researchers to have the ability to infect a different virus. Viruses can also make clones of themselves by pirating another organism’s DNA. That means viruses can clone...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Thank goodness for mothing…it’s certainly a distraction from the bleak outlook and political bullshine of the coronavirus, Covid-19 debacle. Thing is for much of this year, there haven’t been many moths drawn to actinic light lures that I’ve heard off. Lepidopterists on the various lep Facebook groups and around our county here have been reporting low number and low diversity. Cream-bordered Green Pea Bee Moth However, that changed somewhat for my lure on the night of the 75th Anniversary of VE-Day. I’d spent much of the time handling virtual online events, such as my #FEVEG20, but by the eve...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Lepidoptera Source Type: blogs
Insect experts say people should calm down about the big bug with the nickname “murder hornet” — unless you are a beekeeper or a honeybee. The Asian giant hornets found in Washington state that grabbed headlines this week aren’t big killers of humans, although it does happen on rare occasions. But the world’s largest hornets do decapitate entire hives of honeybees, and that crucial food pollinator is already in big trouble. Numerous bug experts told The Associated Press that what they call hornet “hype” reminds them of the 1970s public scare when Africanized honeybees, nicknamed &l...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Environment News Desk wire Source Type: news
LA Times Cooking Editor, Genevieve Ko, turned to GIDEON founder, Dr. Stephen Berger, to get an expert opinion about COVID-19 and food transmission. Dr. Berger provided answers to some common questions people are asking such as: Can COVID-19 be transmitted through food? If so, how? Dr. Berger: There have been no cases of COVID-19 associated with the ingestion of food, but the question is well-founded. COVID-19 is, after all, caused by a virus that enters the body through the nose or mouth. Food items are, after all, objects which may be contaminated with the virus and placed in the mouth — but like many other viruse...
Source: GIDEON blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Press Tips Source Type: blogs
AbstractAt the population level, the virus-host relationship is not set up to end with the complete elimination of either or both. Pathogen-resistant individuals will always remain in the host population. In turn, the virus can never completely eliminate the host population, because evolutionarily such an event is a dead end for the virus as an obligate intracellular parasite. A certain existential balance exists in the virus-host relationship. Against this backdrop, viral epidemics and pandemics only become manifest and egregious to human beings when tens and hundreds of thousands of people die and the question emerges wh...
Source: Inflammation Research - Category: Research Source Type: research
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