Rapid Arterial Occlusion Evaluation Scale Agreement between Emergency Medical Services Technicians and Neurologists

Rapid arterial occlusion evaluation (RACE) scale is a valid prehospital tool used to predict large vessel occlusion of major cerebral arteries in patients with suspected acute stroke. RACE scale administered by Emergency medicine services (EMS) technicians in the prehospital setting correlates well with NIH Stroke Scale score after patient arrival at a hospital. Despite this, the RACE scale is often characterized as too difficult for EMS technicians to accurately utilize. There are no data examining RACE scale accuracy in the prehospital setting comparing EMS technicians with neurologists.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 24 May 2020Source: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation MedicineAuthor(s): Maira Jaqueline da Cunha, Katia Daniele Rech, Ana Paula Salazar, Aline Souza Pagnussat
Source: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine - Category: Rehabilitation Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe e-ASPECTS software generates robust values for e-ASPECTS and acute infarct volumes when using ST ≤ 4 mm with ST = 1 mm yielding the best performance for predicting baseline stroke severity and clinical outcome after 90 days.Key Points•Clinical utility of automatically derived ASPECTS from computed tomography scans was shown in patients with acute ischemic stroke and treatment with mechanical thrombectomy.•Thin slices (=  1 mm) had the highest clinical utility in comparison with thicker slices (2–10 mm) by having the strongest correlation...
Source: European Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
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Source: Biorheology - Category: Biochemistry Tags: Biorheology Source Type: research
Conditions:   Stroke;   Sleep-disordered Breathing;   Sleep Apnea Syndromes;   Sleep Apnea, Obstructive;   Sleep Apnea, Central;   Fragmentation, Sleep Intervention:   Device: Treatment according to standard care recommandation Sponsor:   University Hospital, Grenoble Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conditions:   Stroke;   Activities of Daily Living Interventions:   Behavioral: Approach-Instrumental Activities of Daily Living;   Behavioral: Home rehabilitation Sponsor:   National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Sciences Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
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Source: Neurologia - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Int J Risk Saf Med Source Type: research
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Source: Neuroscience Research - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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Source: Nutritional Neuroscience - Category: Nutrition Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: High Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Prevention - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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