RBBP6 induces non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and high expression is associated with poor prognosis.

RBBP6 induces non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and high expression is associated with poor prognosis. Oncol Lett. 2020 Apr;19(4):2895-2901 Authors: Wang QS, Wei SR, Xiao HL Abstract Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-associated mortality in China with 85% of patients having non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Identifying NSCLC driver genes and prognostic markers is critical to reducing these numbers. The studies of retinoblastoma binding protein 6 (RBBP6) performed on NSCLC is limited. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular function and the prognostic potential of RBBP6 in NSCLC using the A549 cell line and patient samples, respectively. The functional effect on cancer cell proliferation and prognostic value of RBBP6 were examined in vitro and in vivo using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and xenograft implantation. The results demonstrated that RBBP6 mRNA expression was significantly higher in NSCLC tissues compared with in adjacent normal samples. When RBBP6 mRNA expression was interfered with using short hairpin RNA, A549 cell proliferation and xenograft tumor growth were reduced. Additionally, IHC and survival analysis demonstrated that patients with NSCLC with high expression levels of RBBP6 had a shorter median overall survival time compared with patients with low RBBP6 expression (31 vs. 51.5 months), and this was more prominent in stage I-II patients (43 ...
Source: Oncology Letters - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncol Lett Source Type: research

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Mark E. Gray1,2*, James Meehan2,3, Paul Sullivan4, Jamie R. K. Marland4, Stephen N. Greenhalgh1, Rachael Gregson1, Richard Eddie Clutton1, Carol Ward2, Chris Cousens5, David J. Griffiths5, Alan Murray4 and David Argyle1 1The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom 2Cancer Research UK Edinburgh Centre and Division of Pathology Laboratories, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom 3School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Institute of Sensors, Signals and Systems, Heriot-Watt Univer...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Lei Shang1,2 and Minjie Wei1* 1School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Shenyang, China 2Shenyang Medical College, Shenyang, China The protein lysine methyltransferase SMYD2 has recently emerged as a new enzyme modulate gene transcription or signaling pathways, and involved into tumor progression. However, the role of SMYD2 in drug resistant is still not known. Here, we found that inhibition of SMYD2 by specific inhibitor could enhance the cell sensitivity to cisplatin (CDDP), but not paclitaxel, NVB, and VCR in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Further study showed that SMYD2 and its substrates were overex...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Our data supports that never/ever smoker patients with small-cell lung cancer have better prognosis compared to their smoker counterparts. Further, patients with never/ever smoking history who present with small-cell lung cancer have a different mutation profile compared with smokers, including a high frequency of EGFR, MET, and SMAD4 mutations. Further studies are required to assess whether the differential mutation profile is a consequence of a diverse pathological mechanism for disease onset. Introduction Lung cancer is the most common neoplasia worldwide. Aside from the high incidence, lung cancer a...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions In the new era of targeted therapy, treatment options are increasingly based on the precise molecular and genetic profiling of tumor cells (58). Currently, the main challenge for further novel drug development in targeted therapy is the clarification of specific molecular mechanisms underlying the varied forms of tumors in clinic. It has been acknowledged that cancer is caused by a set of driver mutations. In this regard, it is of great significance to: (1) identify and validate key mutant genes and proteins in cancers as new targets; (2) identify patients most likely and unlikely to benefit from certain targe...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Our study shows that retinoblastoma (RB1) mutation is associated with decreased overall survival in patients with locally advanced and advanced non small cell lung cancer. We also show thatRB1 mutation correlates with lack of response to immunotherapy. AbstractThe retinoblastoma gene (RB1) encodes the retinoblastoma (RB) pocket protein that plays an important role in cell cycle progression. Here we determine the frequency and prognostic significance ofRB1 mutation in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), restricting inclusion to Stage III and IV patients with linked genomic and clinical data. The primary outcome was median o...
Source: Cancer Medicine - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
The anthelmintic agent oxfendazole inhibits cell growth in non‑small cell lung cancer by suppressing c‑Src activation. Mol Med Rep. 2019 Jan 28;: Authors: Xu D, Tian W, Jiang C, Huang Z, Zheng S Abstract The c‑Src protein family of tyrosine kinases are important in the tumorigenesis of many types of tumors, and may be a potential target for antitumor drug discovery. In the present study, immunoblotting was performed to analyze protein expression, CCK‑8 assay was carried out to assess cell viability and cell cycle was analyzed using a flow cytometer. The anthelmintic agent oxfendazole was observ...
Source: Molecular Medicine Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Mol Med Rep Source Type: research
Selinexor (KPT-330) is a selective inhibitor of nuclear export (SINE) which specifically targets XPO1 (Exportin 1)-mediated nuclear export, leading to increased nuclear retention of major tumor suppressor proteins and inducing selective apoptosis in cancer cells. Several phase I and II clinical trials demonstrate evidence of anti-cancer activity of Selinexor in solid tumors (i.e metastatic prostate cancer (PMID: 29487219), advanced refractory bone or soft tissue sarcoma (PMID: 27458288) and non-small cell lung cancer (PMID: 28647672); as well as, hematological malignancies, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PMID: 28468797), ...
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: 652. Myeloma: Pathophysiology and Pre-Clinical Studies, excluding Therapy: Poster II Source Type: research
Abstract Panaxydol, a polyacetylenic compound derived from Panax ginseng has been reported to suppress the growth of cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle arrest by this compound in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unknown. Our study found that panaxydol treatment induced cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in NSCLC cells. The cell cycle arrest was accompanied by down-regulation of the protein expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and decrease in the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Furthermore, up-regulation of cyclin-depe...
Source: Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Biol Pharm Bull Source Type: research
In conclusion, the key observations of our study demonstrated that ANRIL depletion could act to suppress retinoblastoma progression by activating the ATM-E2F1 signaling pathway. These results provide a potentially promising basis for the targeted intervention treatment of human retinoblastoma. PMID: 30355646 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Bioscience Reports - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Biosci Rep Source Type: research
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