Birds, buds and bright days: how spring can make us healthier and happier

Longer, lighter days can help us banish old habits, sleep better and improve our mental health, even during the lockdownThank goodness that, in this time of crisis, it is now spring. In the northern hemisphere, at least, we can say hello to green shoots, flowers, bumblebees and butterflies. Finally, the clocks have gone back to British Summer Time. We ’ve lost an hour of sleep, but hello, light.The greatest hope for the new season this year isthatbetter weather will start to makeit harder for coronavirus to spread. And for those lucky enough to still have their health, spring can provide other consolations. Its strong sense of a new beginning nudges our outlook and actions in welcome ways. Katherine Milkman, a behavioural scientist at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, has studied the phenomenon and found that there is more to spring cleaning than the sunlight suddenly showing up cobwebs and window smears. “The start of spring generally makes us feel more motivated – it’s a so-called ‘fresh start date’,” she says. As such, it makes us feel less connected to the past. “That disconnect gives us a sense that whatever we messed up on previously, we can get right now. Maybe the old you failed to quit smoking or start a lasting exercise routine, but the new you can do it.”Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Health & wellbeing Life and style Mental health Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases World news Society Fitness Gardens UK news UK weather Medical research Science Psychology Source Type: news

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The global novel coronavirus pandemic afflicting everyone is showing mixed signs of activity. In some countries it appears to be easing, while in others it appears to be experiencing a resurgence. It’s not at all clear when the pandemic will end, but it’s unlikely to do so before 2021. What has become increasingly clear is that the toll of the pandemic will impact more than the people who come down with COVID-19. The mental health impact of living with a pandemic is being mostly ignored — for now. But as the deaths continue to rise, we need to pay close attention to the cost of the pandemic’s reperc...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy coronavirus COVID-19 Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: (a) The severity of the COVID-19 outbreak has an indirect effect on negative emotions by affecting sleep quality. (b) A possible mitigation strategy for improving mental health includes taking suitable amounts of daily physical activity and sleeping well. (c) The COVID-19 outbreak has reduced people’s aggressiveness, probably by making people realize the fragility and preciousness of life.
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
WHO chief promises independent review of global response; IMF head says full economic recovery unlikely in 2021; Italy records lowest deaths since MarchTrump says he ’s taking hydroxychloroquine despite FDA warningsUK coronavirus updates - liveAustralia coronavirus updates – liveCoronavirus latest: at a glance8.54amBSTA healthcare worker has written this incredibly moving first-hand piece about caring for a Covid-19 patient on a ventilator in hospital.Why was she so special to me? Despite having done this job for a few years, sometimes it is impossible to predict which patients will be the ones you take home wi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news UK news US news Australia news Infectious diseases Science Europe Africa Middle East and North Africa Asia Pacific Americas Microbiology Medical research Source Type: news
Maybe it was because she was a healthcare worker and a mother whose family could not be there when she diedCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWhy was she so special to me? Despite having done this job for a few years, sometimes it is impossible to predict which patients will be the ones you take home with you, the ones you think about as you cry yourself to sleep.Maybe it ’s because she was one of us – a healthcare worker. I know this could happen to me or any of my loving colleagues. I am aware of this risk every time I get into my car to come to work, every time I put on my pers...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Society Infectious diseases Medical research Science Microbiology World news Hospitals Doctors Health NHS Society Professionals Source Type: news
By Irine Chelag ’at Birir , Nurse mentor ; Katherine Seaton, Former editorial officer, IntraHealth InternationalMay 12, 2020Irine Chelag’at Birir is a nurse in Namibia. We asked her to tell us more about her job, including how COVID-19 is affecting work for her and her fellow nurses in the country.Here’s what she told us.Why did you become a nurse?I grew up in a remote village in Kenya. My neighbor’s daughters were nurses and I admired the way they came home in uniform.When I received my acceptance letter from the nursing school, I was so happy, I was over the moon. The joy couldn't be described...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: COVID-19 International Nurses Day Global health security Nursing & Midwifery 2020 Youth Source Type: news
The media we consume daily has an impact on our thinking, behavior, and emotions. If you’ve fallen into a pattern of regularly watching or listening to the news, the majority of what you’re consuming is likely about the coronavirus crisis. While staying up to date on local and national news, especially as it relates to mandates and health updates, is critical during this time, experts say over-consumption of the news can take a toll on your physical, emotional, and mental health. With that in mind, the goal is to find the balance between feeling informed and educated on the situation at hand while not becoming...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Self-Help anxiety coronavirus COVID-19 News Media pandemic stress reduction Source Type: blogs
In late February, several weeks before the coronavirus outbreak shut down American cities and rose to the level of a national crisis, Kerri Rawson began to feel sick. “I was hit out of nowhere with what feels like the flu at first,” says Rawson, who also has asthma and takes cardiac medication for high-blood pressure. “You’re fine, and then all of a sudden you have a fever below 100°F and chest congestion.” Rawson is a 41-year-old writer and mother of two in Florida. (You may recognize her name from her 2019 memoir, about growing up as the daughter of a serial killer.) Her fever lasted for...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Source Type: news
(COVINGTON, La.) — As her desperately sick daughter was being airlifted to a hospital, Jennifer Daly was thinking about all the parts of life that still lay ahead for her 12-year-old and whether she’d ever experience them: Would she get to fall in love? Would she get the chance to get married and have her own children? Driving across the causeway that separates the family’s home north of Lake Pontchartrain from the New Orleans hospital where their daughter was taken — with what was later determined to be a coronavirus infection — she was forced to imagine a life without her Juliet. Read more:...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news
Authors: Shneider A, Kudriavtsev A, Vakhrusheva A Abstract The current COVID-19 pandemic is one of the most devastating events in recent history. The virus causes relatively minor damage to young, healthy populations, imposing life-threatening danger to the elderly and people with diseases of chronic inflammation. Therefore, if we could reduce the risk for vulnerable populations, it would make the COVID-19 pandemic more similar to other typical outbreaks. Children don't suffer from COVID-19 as much as their grandparents and have a much higher melatonin level. Bats are nocturnal animals possessing high levels of mel...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Int Rev Immunol Source Type: research
Stress can affect the quality and length of sleep. Scientists have been collecting dream data during the coronavirus crisis, with surprising resultsFrom going to bed too late thanks to endless scrolling through theories about the pandemic, to waking up in the night worrying, it is safe to say that Covid-19 is wreaking havoc with our sleep. Amajor survey conducted by King ’s College London with Ipsos Mori showed that two in five people in the UK have reported sleep disturbance. Prof Bobby Duffy, the research lead and director of the Policy Institute at King’s, says: “There is a clear relationship between i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sleep Psychology Health & wellbeing Life and style Science Coronavirus outbreak World news Source Type: news
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