Radiation-associated meningioma in the elderly: development of meningioma with olfactory neuroblastoma recurrence 10 years after irradiation.

Radiation-associated meningioma in the elderly: development of meningioma with olfactory neuroblastoma recurrence 10 years after irradiation. Ann Clin Lab Sci. 2013;43(4):460-3 Authors: Johnson MD, Piech K, Emandian S Abstract Introduction The pathogenesis of meningiomas is not established [1,2]. However, intracranial irradiation in childhood is a risk factor for the development of meningiomas later in life [2-6]. Children treated with irradiation for tinea capitis of the scalp showed an almost ten-fold increase in development of meningiomas relative to age-matched controls [2,3]. In a study of almost 18,000 children who survived for at least five years after receiving external beam radiation, 2.3% developed meningiomas within 17 years of follow-up [5]. Notably, meningioma formation after radiation therapy (RT) occurs almost exclusively in patients irradiated as children or young adults. Development of a radiation-associated meningioma (RAM) in patients who received RT in the sixth or seventh decade is very rare. For example, in studies including a total of 58 adults receiving RT, only two cases of RAM occurred in patients 50 years old or older [8,9]. PMID: 24247807 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of Clinical and Laboratory Science - Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Ann Clin Lab Sci Source Type: research

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Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
The identification and accurate contouring of the intraprostatic tumor volume is a crucial step for diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in patients with primary prostate cancer (PCa). In the last decade the concept of focal radiation therapy (RT) has gained interest for patients with PCa and boosting the RT dose to the visible tumor areas within the prostate may improve treatment outcome [1,2]. Moreover, recurrent PCa after conventional RT often occurs at the site of the primary tumor [3,4]. Currently, several phase III trials (e.g.
Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Authors: Ashana A, Kay A, Marco RAW Abstract The management of metastatic spine disease has evolved substantially in the past 5 years. Early treatment approaches with more aggressive surgical indications were based on studies that misinterpreted or overemphasized the advantages of the surgical management of metastatic spine disease. However, substantial advantages in radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biologic agents have led to considerable improvements in patient outcomes and have, in many patients, shifted the paradigm back to nonsurgical or less invasive treatment modalities. Surgeons should be aware of criti...
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Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the quickest growing causes of cancer death in the northern hemisphere. Transplant and resection, the only treatments considered curative, are feasible in only a small minority of patients. Consequently, the landscape of HCC treatment has greatly expanded over the past 10 years. Patients are undergoing treatment with a wide variety of nonoperative interventions, including transarterial chemoembolization and radioembolization using Yttrium-90, and an expanding array of systemic treatments, including sorafenib, regorafenib, and nivolumab.
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research
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