Don ’t Fight with Loved Ones Just Because You’re Upset

Now, more than ever, people need tools to handle their emotions. Specifically, we need tools for calming our nervous system down and making sure we don’t take stress out on our own loved ones. Families are going to fight more when they’re cooped up. The best thing we can do for our relationships is become aware of our emotions and learn skills to calm them so we don’t behave too badly. “Every couple I know said they fought after going to the grocery store last week. Even one that went separately. That’s when I picked a fight with my boyfriend. And it makes sense because the grocery store scene right now is really scary and people don’t realize they’re feeling fear, they push it all to anger,” Jessica Hendel, an LA-based screenwriter, told me. “People are in there fighting each other over toilet paper!” When tensions run high and we find ourselves fighting with the very people we love more than anything in the world, we need to STOP and reflect on what’s happening inside.  When fights break out try these 10 tips: Call a time out for reflection! Identify what you are experiencing. Are you scared? Frustrated? Sad? Anxious? Jittery? Feeling sick inside, alone or uncared for? Whatever feelings you have, just stop and validate them. There’s no wrong way to feel, only wrong ways to behave. Do a self-care check: Ask yourself, Am I hungry or when did I last eat? Many of us are on the anxiety diet. But even ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anger Family Self-Help coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic quarantine Source Type: blogs

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From tidal waves consuming New York City to toilet paper nightmares, reports of apocalyptic, frightening or just plain bizarre pandemic-driven dreams are everywhere. Correspondent Susan Spencer talks about anxiety-fueled dreams with Harvard psychologist Deirdre Barrett, who has collected thousands of pandemic dreams and nightmares as part of a study of our sleep-state responses to coronavirus; Mississippi State University professor Michael Nadorff; and poet Jackie Wang and artist Sandra Haynes, whose dreams have provided metaphorical stories of fear and triumph.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Another term is being added to the lexicon in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic: quarantine brain. It takes many forms, from confusion and fogginess to limited executive functioning. Those who fall prey to it may find themselves unable to complete tasks, manage their time and routine, and make sound decisions. This occurs even if the person has no prior history with attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Some report a lack of motivation to get out of bed, let alone engage in their daily activities. What helps them is knowing that their boss, teachers, and family are counting on them to launch...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Dreams Memory and Perception Personal Coping Skills coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic Resilience social distancing Source Type: blogs
The media we consume daily has an impact on our thinking, behavior, and emotions. If you’ve fallen into a pattern of regularly watching or listening to the news, the majority of what you’re consuming is likely about the coronavirus crisis. While staying up to date on local and national news, especially as it relates to mandates and health updates, is critical during this time, experts say over-consumption of the news can take a toll on your physical, emotional, and mental health. With that in mind, the goal is to find the balance between feeling informed and educated on the situation at hand while not becoming...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Self-Help anxiety coronavirus COVID-19 News Media pandemic stress reduction Source Type: blogs
Driving around her Kearney, Missouri neighborhood is both respite and torture for Kathie Hodgson. She likes seeing other people out and about; it reminds her what life was like before COVID-19. But Hodgson, a 41-year-old teacher who lives alone after a recent divorce, says seeing happy families playing in their yards or walking their dogs can also send her plunging deep into a spiral of loneliness. “You know, as much as I have valued my independence in the past year, it’s finally hitting me that I would like to curl up on the couch with somebody at night,” Hodgson says. The irony, Hodgson says, is she wa...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
The kind of trauma doctors, nurses, and others in direct contact with COVID-19 patients have endured for months now — with an uncertain future posing a threat of many more months of horror in the hardest-hit areas — is the kind of exhausting and overwhelming stress that impacts the brain and the rest of the body in the worst ways. Whether or not these individuals were mentally healthy before the pandemic, this work takes an often-invisible toll. Sometimes, in a life and death struggle, that toll becomes a pull toward suicide. Compassionate Fatigue, also called Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS), can happen when p...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Trauma Compassionate Fatigue coronavirus COVID-19 Healthcare Workers Secondary Traumatic Stress Source Type: blogs
The prolonged health and safety stressors of COVID-19 has many parents reaching out to mental health professionals with concern over their teenagers’ increased levels of anxiety. In the United States, teenagers already experience higher rates of anxiety disorders than any previous generation in history. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, the prevalence of anxiety disorders among adolescents aged 13-18 is 31.9%, with females at a higher rate (38%) than males (26.1%). Some teen anxiety is normal due to typical teen life stressors, including friends and family dynamics, self-identity, body image, ach...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Child Development Coping Skills coronavirus COVID-19 Emotional Development pandemic Uncertainty Source Type: blogs
Authors: Shneider A, Kudriavtsev A, Vakhrusheva A Abstract The current COVID-19 pandemic is one of the most devastating events in recent history. The virus causes relatively minor damage to young, healthy populations, imposing life-threatening danger to the elderly and people with diseases of chronic inflammation. Therefore, if we could reduce the risk for vulnerable populations, it would make the COVID-19 pandemic more similar to other typical outbreaks. Children don't suffer from COVID-19 as much as their grandparents and have a much higher melatonin level. Bats are nocturnal animals possessing high levels of mel...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Int Rev Immunol Source Type: research
As lockdowns drag on and on in many U.S. states, there are worrying signs that people’s resolve to continue social distancing is flagging. An illicit house party in Chicago made headlines this week, as did photos of crowded beaches in Southern California and packed parks in New York City. Anonymized cell-phone data tracked by the University of Maryland also shows more and more people are making non-work-related trips outside as quarantines drag on, and a TIME data analysis found that some states are experiencing new surges in coronavirus cases after initial declines. Jacqueline Gollan, an associate professor of psyc...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is commonly linked with war veterans. This mental health condition however can be triggered by suffering or witnessing any terrifying event like accidents, natural disasters,  violent experience – or a disastrous pandemic. It comes as no surprise that medical health professionals and other people in the frontline of the fight against coronavirus are expected to have a surge in trauma-related illnesses, particularly PTSD. Beside protecting and helping personnel physically as well as mentally, there are also digital health solutions that can come to the rescue. A Canadian r...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Telemedicine & Smartphones Virtual Reality digital health ptsd stress stress management medical professionals digital healthcare coronavirus covid covid19 Source Type: blogs
People all around the world are on lockdown. Many — though not all — suddenly have fewer commitments on their calendars than they ever had before. Freed from all the traveling to work or school and back, from rushing out to meet other people at restaurants or sporting events, and from doing all those errands that are no longer possible because so many places are closed, many of us who are not essential workers and who are not doing even more caregiving than usual, should be feeling especially energetic these days. But that’s not what seems to be happening. All over social media, people are reporting that...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Personal Self-Help Stress coronavirus COVID-19 Depression Fatigue pandemic Source Type: blogs
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