Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, insulin resistance, and sweeteners: a literature review.

We present an up-to-date systematic review of the current literature regarding the safety in artificial and natural sweeteners use as a means of weight loss or diabetes control.Expert opinion: Natural sweeteners have not been associated directly with NAFLD, and on the contrary, some, such as stevia, and trehalose, may have a protective effect. Rare sugars and polyols can be used safely and have significant benefits that include anti-oxidant effect and optimal glycemic control. Artificial sweeteners, due to their effect on NAFLD development and insulin resistance, are not indicated in patients with obesity or diabetes. Further studies in human subjects are required to verify the above findings. PMID: 32212870 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Expert Review of Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Expert Rev Endocrinol Metab Source Type: research

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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of liver disease in the United States, and is estimated to affect up to a quarter of adults in the world. It is defined by excess fat accumulating in the liver and usually occurs in people with obesity, high blood sugars (diabetes), abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels, or high blood pressure. These disorders often run together and as a group are called metabolic syndrome. The “non-alcoholic” part of “non-alcoholic fatty liver disease” is important to distinguish it from alcohol-related liver disease, which can also cause excess liver...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Digestive Disorders Source Type: blogs
Obesity is a serious, chronic, treatable, and global disease epidemic. Over 98 million people currently have the disease of obesity, and in a recent New England Journal of Medicine article, Harvard researchers predicted that by 2030, 50% of the population in the United States will have the disease of obesity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is significantly associated with obesity. While many people with obesity do not have diabetes, most people with T2D have the disease of obesity. Excess adiposity (body fat storage), which is present in obesity, contributes to many chronic diseases beyond T2D. These include high blood pressure, he...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Health Heart Health Surgery Source Type: blogs
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease, with a worldwide prevalence of 25%. In the United States, NAFLD and its subtype, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, affect 30% and 5% of the population, respectively. Considering the ongoing obesity epidemic beginning in childhood, the rise in diabetes, and other factors, the prevalence of NAFLD along with the proportion of those with advanced liver disease is projected to continue to increase. This will have an important impact on public health reflected in health care costs, including impact on the need for liver transplantation, for which nonalcoholic...
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Supplement Source Type: research
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease with a worldwide prevalence of 25%. In the US, NAFLD and its subtype, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), affect 30% and 5% of the population, respectively. Considering the ongoing obesity epidemic beginning in childhood, the rise in Diabetes and other factors, the prevalence of NAFLD along with the proportion of those with advanced liver disease is projected to continue to increase. This will have an important impact on public health reflected in healthcare costs, including impact on the need for liver transplantation, for which NASH is already clo...
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the United States and is soon to be the leading cause of liver transplantation. Patients at the greatest risk are those with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In 2019 the American Diabetes Association guidelines called, for the first time, for clinicians to screen for steatohepatitis and fibrosis all patients with type 2 diabetes and liver steatosis or abnormal plasma aminotransferases. This requires primary care physicians to be aware of key aspects related to the diagnosis and treatment of NAFLD, as well as to when to refer to a specialist.
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasingly recognized public health problem, affecting up to a quarter of the world's adult population. The burden of NAFLD is influenced by the epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the prevalence of these conditions is not expected to decrease in the forthcoming decades. Consequently, the burden of NAFLD-related liver complications (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH], cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma) and the need for life-saving liver transplantation are also expected to increase further in the near future.
Source: Metabolism - Clinical and Experimental - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Invited Review Source Type: research
Abstract Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver disease, the most common cause of chronic liver function augmentation and it will be the most common indication for liver transplantation in 2020. The prevalence of NAFLD has increased over time in line with the increase of obesity and type 2 diabetes. There is a discrepancy between the studies concerning the prevalence of NAFLD because of the different diagnostic methods used (ultrasound or magnetic resonance, fibroscan, controlled attenuation parameter (CAP), histology). Because of its high prevalence the impact of NAFLD in publ...
Source: Presse Medicale - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Presse Med Source Type: research
Authors: Saitta C, Pollicino T, Raimondo G Abstract Obesity prevalence is rapidly increasing worldwide. It is associated with huge economic and health costs due to its clinical consequences, which includes increased incidence of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and development of different malignancies. In particular, obesity is an independent risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Indeed, obesity is highly prevalent in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) that is becoming one of the most frequent causes of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD-related HCC is the mos...
Source: Annals of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Ann Hepatol Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Obesity is a major risk factor for a variety of diseases such as diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and cardiovascular diseases. Restricting energy intake, or caloric restriction (CR), can reduce body weight and improve metabolic parameters in overweight or obese patients. We previously found that Lingguizhugan decoction (LZD) in combination with CR can effectively lower plasma lipid levels in patients with metabolic syndrome. However, the mechanism underlying CR and LZD treatment is still unclear. AIM: To investigate whether CR and LZD improve metabolic parameters by modulating ...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
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