In the Coronavirus Fight in Scandinavia, Sweden Stands Apart

The country has drawn global attention with an unorthodox approach while its neighbors have imposed extensive restrictions.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Sweden Denmark Norway Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Politics and Government Shutdowns (Institutional) Epidemics Source Type: news

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We have read with great interest a recent study of Prof. Jin regarding the clinical features and outcomes of pregnant women suspected of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19)1, especially the significance of pulmonary CT scan plus blood routine examination for screening COVID-19. Due to the worldwide outbreak of infection in the past few months, there were quite a number of urgent hospital admissions for delivery, many effective measures have been taken to reduce the incidence of nosocomial infection and the expansion of the epidemic.
Source: Journal of Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
By MICHEL ACCAD Last month marked the 400th anniversary of the birth of John Graunt, commonly regarded as the father of epidemiology.  His major published work, Natural and Political Observations Made upon the Bills of Mortality, called attention to the death statistics published weekly in London beginning in the late 16th century.  Graunt was skeptical of how causes of death were ascribed, especially in times of plagues.  Evidently, 400 years of scientific advances have done little to lessen his doubts!  A few days ago, Fox News reported that Colorado governor Jared Polis ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Medical Practice Physicians Diagnosis MICHEL ACCAD Source Type: blogs
ConclusionDespite the limited possibility to exercise and the incumbent psychologic stress, glycaemic control improved in patients with T1D who stopped working during the lockdown, suggesting that slowing down routine daily activities can have beneficial effects on T1D management, at least in the short term.
Source: Diabetes Therapy - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
In just a few months, the COVID-19 pandemic has crossed borders and oceans, killing thousands, sickening millions, and forcing millions more to reckon with the economic and personal chaos of closures and lockdowns. Yet as the global infection count rises, the crisis has also given rise to acts of ingenuity. The pandemic has set off a global race for both an effective vaccine and for the accurate, rapid-response tests that will be necessary before workplaces can safely reopen. Vaccines and tests are essential, but they’re not the only front on which to combat the virus. In the face of an urgent threat, scientists have...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
By CHADI NABHAN, MD, MBA, FACP If you are a soccer fan, watching the FIFA World Cup is a ritual that you don’t ever violate. Brazilians, arguably more than any other fans in the world, live and breathe soccer—and they are always expected to be a legitimate contender to win it all. Their expectations are magnified when they are the host country, which was the case in 2014. Not only did the Germans destroy Brazilian World Cup dreams, but less than a year after a humiliating loss on their turf, Brazilians began dealing with another devastating blow: a viral epidemic. Zika left the country scrambling to understa...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Chadi Nabhan epidemic Pandemic Zika Source Type: blogs
We live in unprecedented modern times experiencing how an outbreak of a particular viral disease, COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, also commonly referred to as the Coronavirus, is disrupting societies and personal lives. The virus is likely to spread to most, if not all, countries, illustrating the interconnectedness of the world. At the time of writing, Italy and Spain have become the epicenters in terms of fatalities in Europe, whereas the United States has recorded the most diagnosed cases worldwide. While many national measures to contain, suppress, mitigate, or delay the spread of the virus are being taken, there is gr...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
By SAURABH JHA, MD In a physician WhatsApp group, a doctor posted he had fever of 101° F and muscle ache, gently confessing that it felt like his typical “man flu” which heals with rest and scotch. Nevertheless, he worried that he had coronavirus. When the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the virus on his nasal swab came back negative, he jubilantly announced his relief.  Like Twitter, in WhatsApp emotions quickly outstrip facts. After he received a flurry of cheerful emojis, I ruined the party, advising that despite the negative test he assume he’s infected and ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy RogueRad @roguerad coronavirus coronavirus testing COVID-19 testing false negatives novel coronavirus Pandemic RT-PCR Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs
At midnight on Thursday March 26, all of South Africa went into lockdown. For the next 21 days, no one is to leave their homes unless they are going to the grocery store, the pharmacy or to seek medical help. No dog walking, no jogging, no food delivery services. Only essential workers are exempt, and that list is small. When President Cyril Ramaphosa made the announcement on March 23, a week after shutting the nation’s schools, there were only 402 confirmed COVID-19 cases. But it was essential, he said, to “flatten the curve” before widespread outbreaks overwhelmed the country’s fragile medical sys...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news
As cases of COVID-19 continue to climb in the U.S., there’s a new urgency to make sure there are as many tests as possible to diagnose people who have symptoms that might indicate an infection. Knowing if people are positive is important for guiding their next steps: self-isolation, avoiding contact with others, and, if their symptoms get worse, seeking medical care. To date, access to tests has been spotty at best across the country, and while more kits are now available than even a week ago, most are gene-based assays that take several days for commercial labs to process and produce results. That may change in abo...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
This study, in the same high-tier journal, claims that the sensitivity of CT is 98% vs a sensitivity of 70% for viral PCR. They say: “Our results support the use of chest CT for screening for COVD-19** for patients with clinical and epidemiologic features compatible with COVID-19 infection particularly when RT-PCR testing is negative.” With a statement as strong as that, surely they are saying that they have evidence that CT can be applied broadly? They even mention patients with epidemiological features of infection … that is to say, folks who have been exposed but don’t have symptoms. He...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence COVID-19 Health Tech Physicians Research CT Luke Oakden-Rayner Radiology Source Type: blogs
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