Cancer Care Delivery Challenges Amidst Coronavirus Disease - 19 (COVID-19) Outbreak: Specific Precautions for Cancer Patients and Cancer Care Providers to Prevent Spread.

Cancer Care Delivery Challenges Amidst Coronavirus Disease - 19 (COVID-19) Outbreak: Specific Precautions for Cancer Patients and Cancer Care Providers to Prevent Spread. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2020 Mar 01;21(3):569-573 Authors: Shankar A, Saini D, Roy S, Mosavi Jarrahi A, Chakraborty A, Bharti SJ, Taghizadeh-Hesary F Abstract Coronavirus outbreak has affected thousands of people in at least 186 countries which has affected the cancer care delivery system apart from affecting the overall health system. Cancer patients are more susceptible to coronavirus infection than individuals without cancer as they are in an immunosuppressive state because of the malignancy and anticancer treatment. Oncologists should be more attentive to detect coronavirus infection early, as any type of advanced cancer is at much higher risk for unfavorable outcomes. Oncology communities must ensure that cancer patients should spend more time at home and less time out in the community. Oncologists and other health care professionals involved in cancer care have a critical opportunity to communicate to their patients to pass on right information regarding practice modifications in view of COVID-19 outbreaks. Countries must isolate, test, treat and trace to control the coronavirus pandemic. There is a paucity of information on novel coronavirus infection and its impact on cancer patients and cancer care providers. To date, there is no scientific guideline regarding management of can...
Source: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Asian Pac J Cancer Prev Source Type: research

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Will Rogers, director of a senior softball tournament scheduled to take place in early June in Columbia, Mo., will be hosting an event that seems inherently dangerous. In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, you’d be hard-pressed to find a public health expert who thinks a gathering of 60 teams from various states, with players ranging in age from 40 to 70-plus, is a good idea. The data could not be clearer: older Americans are most at risk of suffering fatal consequences of the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. However, Rogers, who will also suit up to play with the 65-and-over Kansas City Kids at the Missour...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
AbstractThe coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) outbreak is having a profound impact on the management of patients with cancer. In this review, we comprehensively investigate the various aspects of cancer care during the pandemic, taking advantage of data generated in Asia and Europe at the frontline of the COVID-19 pandemic spread. Cancer wards have been subjected to several modifications to protect patients and healthcare professionals from COVID-19 infection, while attempting to maintain cancer diagnosis, therapy, and research. In this setting, the management of COVID-19 infected patients with cancer is particularly chall...
Source: Targeted Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
Conclusion In 1919 George A. Soper1 wrote that the deadly Spanish Flu pandemic that swept around the earth was without any precedents, and that there had been no such catastrophe ‘so sudden, so devastating and so universal’. He remarked that, “The most astonishing thing about the pandemic was the complete mystery which surrounded it. Nobody seemed to know what the disease was, where it came from or how to stop it. Anxious minds are inquiring today whether another wave of it will come again”. With close to 3 million positive cases and around 0.2 million deaths worldwide, the coronavirus has compelle...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
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Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Anish Koka COVID-19 testing Source Type: blogs
The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which originated in Wuhan, China in late 2019, has become a major concern all over the world. By March 11, 2020, the number of cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection outside China had increased 13-fold, and the number of affected countries had tripled. With more than 118,000 people affected by the virus worldwide and 4,291 deaths, the World Health Organization announced that the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was a pandemic.
Source: European Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
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Source: Indian Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
We read the paper by Indini et colleagues with great interest.(1) The current health crisis due to the COVID-9 outbreak represents a serious challenge for cancer patient management. Furthermore, in Italy a high proportion of patients travel from one region to another for healthcare, increasing the risk of spreading the virus. (2).
Source: European Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
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Source: L Encephale - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Encephale Source Type: research
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