Switching from clozapine to paliperidone palmitate-3-monthly improved obesity, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia lowering antipsychotic dose equivalents in a treatment-resistant schizophrenia cohort

Clozapine, an antipsychotic developed in 1958, is considered the gold standard and the treatment of choice in treatment-resistant schizophrenia despite its side effects and despite 40–70% of these patients not responding to clozapine. In the last decade, new antipsychotics, such as paliperidone palmitate (PP), have emerged as well as its long acting-injectable (LAI) formulations, available as PP-1-monthly (PP1M) and the newest PP-3-montlhy (PP3M). Despite paliperidone having shown a similar efficacy as others antipsychotics for the treatment of schizophrenia, and that PP3M has been shown to reduce relapses compared to oral formulations, no study has been carried out in treatment-resistant schizophrenia. The aim of our study was to carry out an exploratory evaluation of endocrine and hepatic profiles as well as the concomitant treatments associated to PP3M vs. clozapine, the gold standard, in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia. We designed a retrospective study. A total number of 33 patients previously diagnosed as schizophrenics treatment-resistant, who were prescribed clozapine followed by PP1M and PP3M when available, were selected. Demographic data, BMI, hepatic enzymes (glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamate-pyruvate transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT)], thyroid function (thyroid stimulating hormone), blood platelets and both white and red blood cells as well as the use of concomitant antipsychotics, benzodiazepines and biperiden wer...
Source: International Clinical Psychopharmacology - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS: Trials of antidepressants may be driven mainly by commercial interests, focusing on prevalent diseases and everyday problems. No one can live a full life without experiencing several of the problems for which these drugs were tested. Antidepressants, sometimes called happy pills, could be seen as the modern version of Aldous Huxley's soma pill intended to keep everyone happy in the "Brave New World". PMID: 32444565 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: International Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Int J Risk Saf Med Source Type: research
 When was the last time you simply enjoyed being in nature? Whether it’s a camping trip to the mountains, a walk in the park or just watching the squirrels from your backyard, being in nature is profoundly healing. In today’s Psych Central Podcast, our guest Richard Louv, a journalist, author and co-founder of the nonprofit Children &Nature Network, discusses the science behind nature’s healing powers. What counts as “nature?” Are pets included? What are some modern barriers to accessing nature, and how can we overcome them? Join us for the answers to these questions and more. SUBSCRIB...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Green and Environment Interview LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Podcast Stress The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
By Emma Young We all know that too little sleep is bad for us. Matthew Walker, a UC Berkeley sleep scientist and author of the best-selling Why We Sleep, has gone so far as to declare: “The shorter you sleep, the shorter your life.” However, some researchers fear that our concerns about not getting enough sleep are becoming overblown — and that, ironically, they could be making the problem worse. In this feature, we take a look at evidence that “too little” sleep isn’t always the disaster that it’s held up to be. It’s not always about a lack of sleep You’ll be fami...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Feature Sleep and dreaming Source Type: blogs
This study aims to determine if SCZ patients are at increased risk of incident OSA.MethodsA total of 5092 newly diagnosed SCZ patients and 5092 non-SCZ controls matched by gender, age, and index year were included between 2000 and 2012 and followed to 2013. Participants newly diagnosed with OSA were defined as incidents. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the OSA incidence rate between the two groups studied.ResultsSCZ patients were at increased risk of OSA compared to non-SCZ controls after adjusting for gender, age, comorbidities, and duration of anti...
Source: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Liu Z, Zhang Y, Zhao T, Wang J, Xia L, Zhong Y, Yang Y, Ning X, Zhang Y, Ren Z, Liu H Abstract Objective: Orexin-A is involved in numerous physiological functions, such as feeding behavior and energy balance. Yet, the associations among the orexin system, weight changes and the clinical symptoms of schizophrenia patients remain uncertain, especially in inpatients with chronic schizophrenia (CS). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the orexin-A levels, body mass index (BMI) and clinical symptoms of CS inpatients.Methods: Altogether, 324 inpatients were enrolled in our study...
Source: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Nord J Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Bueno-Antequera J, Munguía-Izquierdo D Abstract Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder characterized by distortions of thinking and perception, with no strictly pathognomonic symptoms that can be divided into positive, negative, and cognitive symptom domains. People with schizophrenia have, between others, a reduced life expectancy and cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness and increased risk of cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia compared to the general population. Furthermore, the economic burden of mental disorders including schizophrenia is evid...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
by Gianna W. Maurer, Alina Malita, Stanislav Nagy, Takashi Koyama, Thomas M. Werge, Kenneth A. Halberg, Michael J. Texada, Kim Rewitz The human 22q11.2 chromosomal deletion is one of the strongest identified genetic risk factors for schizophrenia. Although the deletion spans a number of known genes, the contribution of each of these to the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DS) is not known. To investigate the effect of individual genes within this interval on the pathophysiology associated with the deletion, we analyzed their role in sleep, a behavior affected in virtually all psychiatric disorders, including the 22q11.2 DS. We ...
Source: PLoS Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Source Type: research
Anthropometric traits and mental disorders or traits are known to be associated clinically and to show genetic overlap. We aimed to identify genetic variants with relevance for mental disorders/traits and either (i) body mass index (or obesity), (ii) body composition, (and/or) (iii) body fat distribution. We performed a look-up analysis of 1,005 genome-wide significant SNPs for BMI, body composition, and body fat distribution in 15 mental disorders/traits. We identified 40 independent loci with one or more SNPs fulfilling our threshold significance criterion (P
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Purpose of review The gut microbiota has been speculated to underpin metabolic changes associated with chronic antipsychotic use. The change in the gut microbiota can also cause abnormal absorbtion from the gut into the blood stream (leaky gut syndrome) that can lead to inflammatory reactions, and thus, secondary damage to the brain and central nervous system. Our article aims to highlight relevant research on antipsychotic's effect on the microbiota and to point out future directions. Recent findings Antipsychtoic use can result in specific microbiota changes, and it is important to differentiate this from the innate...
Source: Current Opinion in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: SCHIZOPHRENIA AND RELATED DISORDERS: Edited by Lynn E. DeLisi and Iris E.C. Sommer Source Type: research
Abstract All large population-based administrative studies currently indicate a significant comorbidity of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with addictive, anxiety and in particular affective disorders. In these investigations the risk for one of these comorbid disorders increased with increasing age of the ADHD patients. The most recent genome-wide association and correlation studies also revealed indications for joint genetic risk factors of ADHD with, in particular unipolar depression, bipolar disorder, autism spectrum disorders, Tourette's syndrome and to a lesser extent schizophrenia...
Source: Der Nervenarzt - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Nervenarzt Source Type: research
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