Advocates Say Trump Administration ’s Decision to Keep National Parks Open Is ‘Reckless’

(WASHINGTON) — The Trump administration is sticking with its crowd-friendly waiver of entrance fees at national parks during the coronavirus pandemic, as managers at some parks try and fail to keep visitors a safe distance apart and communities appeal for a shutdown at other parks that are still open. While the Interior Department agreed this week to requests from local managers of Yellowstone and some other iconic national parks to close, others remained open and newly free of charge. In Arizona, local governments and the Navajo Nation were waiting for an answer Thursday on their request earlier this week for federal officials to shut down Grand Canyon National Park as cases of the coronavirus grow in surrounding areas. “We think it’s just in the best interest of the community, the visitors and the staff,” said Lena Fowler, a supervisor in Coconino County, which includes the Grand Canyon. “What we’re really concerned about is making sure everyone is safe.” Park officials announced Thursday evening that three of the canyon’s most popular trails — Bright Angel, South Kaibab and North Kaibab — were being temporarily closed as of noon Friday, with some other operations being modified. The National Parks Conservation Association, a nonprofit group that advocates on park policy issues, called the administration’s decision to keep the Grand Canyon open “beyond reckless.” The Trump administration has issu...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news

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This study showed that a five-day regimen is as effective as 10 days–that’s important, doctors say, since it could mean shorter stays in the hospital, which could alleviate some of the burden on the health care system. “Of course we will have to wait for the final review of all the data, but it would be very nice to have an anti-viral that’s efficacious in this terrible illness,” says Dr. Aruna Subramanian, a clinical professor of medicine at Stanford and an investigator on the study. “At least we know that we can help patients with this, and that’s really the bottom line.” T...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
Conclusions: First-level treatments include repurposing antivirals and antimalarials, and plasma infusion should help, but development of existing or new molecules into vaccines will take time. The unpredictable trajectory of this outbreak demands careful surveillance to monitor the situation, draw strategies, implement control measures, and create proper ethical laws and medical guidelines. PMID: 32412918 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Altern Ther Health Med Source Type: research
In late February, several weeks before the coronavirus outbreak shut down American cities and rose to the level of a national crisis, Kerri Rawson began to feel sick. “I was hit out of nowhere with what feels like the flu at first,” says Rawson, who also has asthma and takes cardiac medication for high-blood pressure. “You’re fine, and then all of a sudden you have a fever below 100°F and chest congestion.” Rawson is a 41-year-old writer and mother of two in Florida. (You may recognize her name from her 2019 memoir, about growing up as the daughter of a serial killer.) Her fever lasted for...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Source Type: news
When Dai Yufan began developing a fever and painful cyst, her first thought was to see a doctor. But due to the COVID-19 pandemic, visiting her local hospital seemed scarier than her symptoms. “So I tried an online health service,” says Dai, 27, an office worker in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen. “I asked about my condition via an app and [a doctor online] suggested some medicine and other treatments.” While the coronavirus has stretched medical services around the world to breaking point, the virus has also fostered a boom in online medical services, known as telehealth. The industry is pred...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news
Abstract Pneumonia caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection emerged in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China in December 2019. By Feb. 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) officially named the disease resulting from infection with SARS-CoV-2 as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). COVID-19 represents a spectrum of clinical manifestations that typically include fever, dry cough, and fatigue, often with pulmonary involvement. SARS-CoV-2 is highly contagious and most individuals within the population at large are susceptible to infection. Wild animal hosts and infected pat...
Source: J Zhejiang Univ Sci ... - Category: Science Authors: Tags: J Zhejiang Univ Sci B Source Type: research
Authors: Burhan E, Prasenohadi P, Rogayah R, Isbaniyah F, Reisa T, Dharmawan I Abstract Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), previously called 2019-nCoV, is a novel disease caused by SARS- CoV-2 which was first identified as outbreak of unknown respiratory illness in Wuhan, China. COVID- 19 was declared as global health emergency by WHO on March 11, 2020 and quickly elevated to global pandemic on 11 March 2020. COVID-19 symptom is highly various in each patient, with fever, fatigue, shortness of breath, and cough as the main presenting symptoms. Patient with COVID-19 may shows severe symptom with severe pneumonia a...
Source: Acta medica Indonesiana - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Acta Med Indones Source Type: research
(BOISE, Idaho) — They are two disasters that require opposite responses: To save lives and reduce the spread of COVID-19, people are being told to remain isolated. But in a wildfire, thousands of firefighters must work in close quarters for weeks at a time. Wildfires have already broken out in Texas and Florida, and agencies are scrambling to finish plans for a new approach. They are considering waivers for some training requirements to previously-certified crew members, and moving some training online. Other proposals include limiting fire engines to a driver and one passenger, requiring other crew members to ride i...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Environment News Desk wire Source Type: news
In early April, about four months after a new, highly infectious coronavirus was first identified in China, an international group of scientists reported encouraging results from a study of an experimental drug for treating the viral disease known as COVID-19. It was a small study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, but showed that remdesivir, an unapproved drug that was originally developed to fight Ebola, helped 68% of patients with severe breathing problems due to COVID-19 to improve; 60% of those who relied on a ventilator to breathe and took the drug were able to wean themselves off the machines after 18...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
One of the worst symptoms of any plague is uncertainty—who it will strike, when it will end, why it began. Merely understanding a pandemic does not stop it, but an informed public can help curb its impact and slow its spread. It can also provide a certain ease of mind in a decidedly uneasy time. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 pandemic from TIME’s readers, along with the best and most current answers science can provide. A note about our sourcing: While there are many, many studies underway investigating COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-19, the novel coronavirus that causes the illn...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Source Type: news
If you ask us at The Medical Futurist about the importance of artificial intelligence in healthcare, we will have a lot to talk about. We’ve seen how it could solve alarm fatigue in hospitals. We’ve analyzed the unusual associations the technology discovered in medicine. We believe it will usher the real era of the Art of Medicine. Dr. Meskó even embarked on a journey to better understand the language of A.I. So of course, with the COVID-19 pandemic, we had to explore the contribution of A.I. in this public health crisis. We came across promising endeavours involving such algorithms from mining for in...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence Future of Medicine digital health coronavirus covid covid19 Source Type: blogs
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