Experts condemn Clive Palmer-funded ads claiming hydroxychloroquine can cure coronavirus

Queensland businessman has pledged to fund 1m doses, despite warnings it can lead to heart attacks, eye damage and comaProminent advertisements paid for by former federal politician Clive Palmer which promote a malaria drug as a potential “cure” for Covid-19 are “ethically immoral” according to Prof Peter Collignon, a former World Health Organization advisor who worked on Australia’s response to the Sars virus.The two-page ad in the Australian states the drug, hydroxychloroquine, when combined with another medication could “wipe out the virus in test tubes”. The ad says Palmer – who has headed several failed businesses and has been hit with criminal charges following an investigation by the corporate regulator – had agreed to personally fund the acquisition or manufacture of 1m doses “to ensure all Australia ns would have access to the drug as soon as possible”.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Clive Palmer Health Australia news Infectious diseases Medical research Source Type: news

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