‘Managers are bringing tea to us’: inside the 111 service during COVID-19

Stella Quentin is a 111 call handler for the South East Coast ambulance service. In normal times, the 300 call handlers in Stella’s office take around two to three thousand calls a day. The severity of calls ranges from sore throats and coughs to people who have taken drug overdoses. A 111 call handler has to be ready to deal with whatever is on the other end of the phone. As COVID-19 has emerged, the volume of calls has doubled, with some days seeing 7,000 calls. “Normally, it’s quite a brutal place to work,” says Stella. “The pressure is constant and, as soon as you finish one call you have to pick up the next. “You never know what you’re getting on the next call. We have targets to answer calls within 60 seconds and we have timed 10-minute breaks. It’s a high-pressure workplace, and that pressure has increased over the years because people can’t get GP appointments. “If you’re not logged on and taking calls, managers will come and find out why. “But once the call levels started to go up through the roof with COVID, the pressure from management has stopped. We already have overtime policies in place, but now managers give us extra breaks and, this Saturday, my manager was pushing a tea trolley round to bring us hot drinks while we were taking calls.” And Stella continues: “Managers have been emailing us with really positive affirmations, saying ‘you’re all doing great, you’...
Source: UNISON Health care news - Category: UK Health Authors: Tags: Article ambulance ambulance service coronavirus coronavirus health workers Covid-19 Source Type: news

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Source: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research
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Source: L Encephale - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Encephale Source Type: research
Jeffrey A. SingerPublic health interventions entail non ‐​economic as well as economic trade‐​offs. Some trade ‐​offs can involve other aspects of public health.I havewrittenabout how blanket bans on elective medical procedures combine with the fear already infused in the public to cause crucial delays in necessary health care. This adds to human suffering from causes other than the COVID-19 virus. Many people with chronic conditions, particularlychronic pain patients, are disproportionately affected by reduced access to routine care. Then there ’s the dramatic drop ‐...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery addiction treatment aftercare coronavirus covid-19 covid19 drug overdose Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Stress Suicide coronavirus COVID-19 Depression pandemic Task sharing Source Type: blogs
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Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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