These Families Traveled Twice Across the World to Stay Ahead of Coronavirus. They ’re Learning Nowhere Is Safe

Mary Wong fled her native Hong Kong on Feb. 20 with her one-year-old daughter and her husband. The situation there looked grim—the city had 70 cases of COVID-19 and two deaths, and officials were refusing calls to fully close the border with mainland China. To stay safe, Wong and her family decided to fly halfway across the world to Philadelphia, where her husband is from. There were no cases there yet, and just 15 in the U.S. They planned to stay for up to two months to avoid the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak that was increasingly threatening China’s neighbors. Less than a month later, she fled again, this time back home to Hong Kong—booking her return tickets on March 13, the same day U.S. President Donald Trump declared a national emergency. By that time, the first cases of COVID-19 were confirmed in Philadelphia, hundreds were reported in New York state and cases across the U.S. had soared to more than 2,000. “It was actually an obvious decision to come back,” Wong says. “Hong Kong seemed safer. Even in the suburbs, you don’t know how many people have gone to New York or other states, and come back to Philadelphia.” Wong’s family is one of several that fled Asia as the coronavirus spread across China, only to decide that their refuge thousands of miles away had suddenly become even riskier. That there-and-back-again ordeal shows the rapid global spread of the virus that causes COVID-19, which has now infected more th...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk overnight Source Type: news

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Every time she has to buy groceries lately, Lily Marquez gets worried. She lives in a two-bedroom apartment in San Francisco with her two young children, her husband, her chronically ill mother-in-law, and her husband’s grandmother. Both of the older women are at high-risk of becoming severely ill if they get COVID-19, and she doesn’t want to be the one to infect them. But while many Americans have switched to online grocery shopping to avoid crowded spaces during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, that’s not an option for Marquez—or the millions of other low-income women and children who rely on th...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
When Eric Freeland, 34, started coughing at the end of March, he didn’t think much of it. But when his symptoms grew worse, Freeland’s mother began to worry. Freeland is a Native American living with his family in the Navajo Nation in the southwestern U.S., where access to healthcare is limited. He is also diabetic, putting him at greater risk to the coronavirus. When Freeland’s breathing became short and stuttered, his mother drove him to the nearest hospital where within minutes of arriving, he lost consciousness. He awoke three weeks later, hooked up to a ventilator, from a medically induced coma. &l...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news
Discussions with the FDA are ongoing to define the required data set for filing Janssen’s Ebola vaccine regimen under the FDA’s Animal Rule licensure pathway. About Janssen’s Ebola Vaccine Regimen The Janssen investigational preventive Ebola vaccine regimen (Ad26.ZEBOV, MVA-BN-Filo) utilizes a viral vector strategy in which viruses – in this case adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) – are genetically modified so that they cannot replicate in human cells. In addition, these vectors are modified to safely carry the genetic code of an Ebola virus protein in order...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news
THE CORONAVIRUS DISEASE 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak that spread from Wuhan, China, in December 2019 became a global pandemic within about 2 months, causing more than 330,000 deaths worldwide so far (at the time of writing).1 This has forced hospitals in the most affected countries and regions around the world to rearrange their activity, creating new spaces and pathways while reducing nonurgent admissions and health services.2 Although only a minority of patients infected with the new severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) develop symptoms severe enough to require intensive care unit (ICU) admission,3 th...
Source: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
As nations around the world scramble to bring coronavirus outbreaks under control, Dr. Raj Panjabi is worried that the world’s poor populations will be excluded from accessing treatments and prevention measures, a scenario he calls “viral apartheid.” “I don’t use that term lightly,” said Panjabi, speaking with TIME Senior Writer Alice Park during a TIME 100 Talks discussion on May 28. “The idea that a group of people—whether it’s the vaccines, the test or treatments—will get access to those vital life-saving tools, and that those will likely be the rich nations an...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME100 Talks Source Type: news
As nations around the world scramble to bring coronavirus outbreaks under control, Dr. Raj Panjabi is worried that the world’s poor populations will be excluded from accessing treatments and prevention measures, a scenario he calls “viral apartheid.” “I don’t use that term lightly,” said Panjabi, speaking with TIME Senior Writer Alice Park during a TIME 100 Talks discussion on May 28. “The idea that a group of people—whether it’s the vaccines, the test or treatments—will get access to those vital life-saving tools, and that those will likely be the rich nations an...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME100 Talks Source Type: news
COVID-19 is caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (Cov)-2, an enveloped virus with a positive-polarity, single-stranded RNA genome. The initial outbreak of the pandemic began in December 2019, and it is affecting the human health of the global community. In common with previous pandemics (Influenza H1N1 and SARS-CoV) and the epidemics of Middle east respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV, CoVs target bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells. Virus protein ligands (e.g., haemagglutinin or trimeric spike glycoprotein for Influenza and CoV, respectively) interact with cellular receptors, such as (dependin...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Yehua Shen, Chien-shan Cheng, Peng Wang, Xu Zhu, Guangyan Lei, Yong Fang, Hailiang Li, Weijun Fan, Hongming Pan, Zhe Tang, Kuansheng Ma, Xiaoguang Li, Zhengyu Lin, Yiping Zhuang, Xin Ye, Bo Zhai, Yue Han, Jinhua Huang, Huixiong Xu, Rongqin Zheng, Rufu Chen, Jie Yu, Dong Xu, Zhongmin Wang, Zhiqiang MengJournal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2020 16(2):350-355 The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global pandemic since its outbreak in December 2019, which posed a threat to the safety and well-being of people on a global scale. Cancer patients are at high risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavi...
Source: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractThe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a life-threatening pandemic. The epidemic trends in different countries vary considerably due to different policy-making and resources mobilization. We calculated basic reproduction number (R0) and the time-varying estimate of the effective reproductive number (Rt) of COVID-19 by using the maximum likelihood method and the sequential Bayesian method, respectively. European and North American countries possessed higher R0 and unsteady Rt fluctuations, whereas some heavily affected Asian countries showed relatively low R0 and declining Rt now. The numbers of patients...
Source: Frontiers of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Children whose parents work on the front lines of the coronavirus outbreak worry about jobs they say are important but hazardous.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Epidemics Parenting Workplace Hazards and Violations Anxiety and Stress Quarantine (Life and Culture) Hospitals Source Type: news
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