Which cancer patients should be continuing chemotherapy during the coronavirus? | Ranjana Srivastava

Here are some questions that all chemotherapy patients should ask their oncologistFrom a clinic emptied of patients but not their problems, I begin a series of phone consults, the first of which is to an increasingly fatigued man who lives alone. For a while I have rued the day someone suggested he have chemotherapy because now he has poured all his energies into having intensifying toxic treatment for a terminal illness. I know that he appreciates seeing the nurses but suddenly the stakes have risen.Careful not to sound punitive, I say: “Let’s consider a chemotherapy break.”Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Cancer Health Infectious diseases Science Source Type: news

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AbstractThe ongoing spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) poses a significant threat to global health. As the coronavirus outbreak began spreading, hospitals were forced to relocate resources to treat the growing number of COVID-19 patients. As a consequence, doctors across the country canceled tens of thousands of nonurgent surgeries. However, recognizing that the COVID-19 situation may be highly variable and fluid in different communities across the country, elective surgery could be still allowed in some centers for patients included in t...
Source: Endocrine - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
More than 24,000 cases of cancer have gone undiagnosed according to Cancer Research UKAlmost 2.5 million Britons have not been screened, tested or treated for cancer because the Covid-19 pandemic has led to “enormous disruption” of NHS care for the disease, experts have warned.More than 24,000 cases of cancer have gone undiagnosed as a result of the suspension of normal services while delays in treatment mean some people ’s disease is now inoperable, Cancer Research UK (CRUK) says.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Cancer Health Society Coronavirus outbreak Science NHS Cancer research UK news Source Type: news
When Eric Freeland, 34, started coughing at the end of March, he didn’t think much of it. But when his symptoms grew worse, Freeland’s mother began to worry. Freeland is a Native American living with his family in the Navajo Nation in the southwestern U.S., where access to healthcare is limited. He is also diabetic, putting him at greater risk to the coronavirus. When Freeland’s breathing became short and stuttered, his mother drove him to the nearest hospital where within minutes of arriving, he lost consciousness. He awoke three weeks later, hooked up to a ventilator, from a medically induced coma. &l...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news
Authors: Wang Y, Zhang S, Wei L, Lin Z, Wang X, Wang J, Hua K, Cui M, Wang J, Wang S, Di W, Wang Y, An R, Xi M, Guo R, Zhou Q, Xie X, Xue F Abstract The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 has rapidly spread globally. Cancer patients are at a higher risk of being infected with the coronavirus and are more likely to develop severe complications, as compared to the general population. The increasing spread of COVID-19 presents challenges for the clinical care of patients with gynecological malignancies. Concerted efforts should be put into mana...
Source: Journal of Gynecologic Oncology - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Gynecol Oncol Source Type: research
AbstractThe continuing outbreak of the  coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has inflicted considerable burdens onto the health system of China, the world's most populous country. Remarkably, among spectrum of potential mitigation strategies, the Chinese government has implemented all-out lock downs on large geographical areas, unprecedented in the modern era. This inevitably undermined the right to healthcare of many who now faced great difficulty in getting treatment, especially those with cancer or other life-threatening issues. We elaborate and discuss the m...
Source: Cancer Causes and Control - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
In Washington State and Italy, the first confirmed cases were not linked to the outbreaks that followed, the analysis found. The epidemics were seeded later.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: your-feed-science Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Genetics and Heredity Epidemics Hutchinson, Fred, Cancer Research Center Seattle-Tacoma International Airport University of Arizona University of Washington Worobey, Michael G (1970- ) Europe I Source Type: news
AbstractMelanoma is one of the most common cancers, with an increasing incidence worldwide. Disease stage represents the most important prognosis factor; therefore, early diagnosis is essential for melanoma patients ’ survival rates. Following the outbreak in China, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has spread all over the world and the majority of dermatological visits have been postponed. These measures could cause a delay in melanoma diagnosis and management leading to an increase of morbidi ty, mortality and healthcare costs. Herein we propose an alternative model of skin cancer screening and the o...
Source: Dermatology and Therapy - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Since its outbreak in December 2019 [1], the novel coronavirus (SARS –CoV-2) and associated respiratory disease (COVID-19) have led to a global pandemic, adversely impacting healthcare across the world [2]. The field of oncology faces particular challenges, as reports from Wuhan indicate that cancer patients are more vulnerable to COVID-19 and carry a greater risk of morbidity and death [3]. These data are corroborated by reports from Italy [4–6], in which radiotherapy (RT) departments have also been impacted [7,8], and data from New York City [9].
Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Rapid Communication Source Type: research
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), previously known as the novel coronavirus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged in December 2019 and spread worldwide. The World Health Organization declared this pandemic outbreak a global public health emergency, and as of April 7, 2020, 1,282,931 cases and 72,774 deaths have been reported in 211 countries.[1] Approximately 18 million cases of cancer are diagnosed worldwide annually;[2] thus, treating and simultaneously protecting these patients against SARS-CoV-2 infection is a challenge.
Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Rapid Letter Source Type: research
Yehua Shen, Chien-shan Cheng, Peng Wang, Xu Zhu, Guangyan Lei, Yong Fang, Hailiang Li, Weijun Fan, Hongming Pan, Zhe Tang, Kuansheng Ma, Xiaoguang Li, Zhengyu Lin, Yiping Zhuang, Xin Ye, Bo Zhai, Yue Han, Jinhua Huang, Huixiong Xu, Rongqin Zheng, Rufu Chen, Jie Yu, Dong Xu, Zhongmin Wang, Zhiqiang MengJournal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2020 16(2):350-355 The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global pandemic since its outbreak in December 2019, which posed a threat to the safety and well-being of people on a global scale. Cancer patients are at high risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavi...
Source: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
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