Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic and Pregnancy

The current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia pandemic, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus, is spreading globally at an accelerated rate, with a basic reproduction number (R0) of 2 – 2.5, indicating that 2 – 3 persons will be infected from an index patient. A serious public health emergency, it is particularly deadly in vulnerable populations and communities in which healthcare providers are insufficiently prepared to manage the infection. As of March 16, 2020, there are m ore than 180,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 worldwide, with over 7,000 related deaths.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Special Report Source Type: research

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 30 May 2020Source: Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and TraumaAuthor(s): Raja Bhaskara Rajasekaran, Duncan Whitwell, Thomas Daniel Arthur Cosker, Christopher Leonard Max Gibbons
Source: Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 May 2020Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesAuthor(s): Renata Bracale, Concetta M. Vaccaro
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 May 2020Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesAuthor(s): Anna Vittoria Mattioli, Susanna Sciomer, Camilla Cocchi, Silvia Maffei, Sabina Gallina
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
ConclusionsMost of the pregnant COVID ‐19 positive patients had a favorable clinical course. However, one‐third of them developed pneumonia, of whom 5% presented a critical clinical status. CRP and D‐dimer levels positively correlated with severe pneumonia and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio decreased as the patients improved clin ically. Seventy‐eight percent of patients had a vaginal delivery. No vertical or horizontal transmissions were diagnosed in the neonates during labor or breastfeeding.
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
Conclusions: No major complication were reported among the studied cohort, though one serious case and one perinatal infection were observed. Much effort should be done to reduce the pathogenic effect of COVID-19 infection in pregnancies. PMID: 32422078 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine - Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Arch Pathol Lab Med Source Type: research
The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has spread rapidly across the globe. In contrast to initial reports, recent studies suggest that children are just as likely as adults to become infected with the virus but have fewer symptoms and less severe disease. In this review, we summarize the epidemiologic and clinical features of children infected with SARS-CoV-2 reported in pediatric case series to date. We also summarize the perinatal outcomes of neonates born to women infected with SARS-CoV-2 in pregnancy. We found 11 case series including a total of 333 infants and children. Overal...
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Special Article Source Type: research
AbstractThe severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS ‐CoV‐2) pandemic has presented many challenges in healthcare, including obstetrics. Therefore, we read with great interest the special editorial published in the AOGS regarding clinical recommendations for the management of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) in pregnant women.1 As illustrated by the authors, the usefulness and safety of corticosteroids as an adjuvant therapy for COVID ‐19 pneumonia remains controversial. Corticosteroids may diminish the inflammatory response, a major factor for lung damage and acute respiratory distress syndrome in ...
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: LETTER TO EDITOR Source Type: research
One of the worst symptoms of any plague is uncertainty—who it will strike, when it will end, why it began. Merely understanding a pandemic does not stop it, but an informed public can help curb its impact and slow its spread. It can also provide a certain ease of mind in a decidedly uneasy time. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 pandemic from TIME’s readers, along with the best and most current answers science can provide. A note about our sourcing: While there are many, many studies underway investigating COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-19, the novel coronavirus that causes the illn...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Source Type: news
More than 130 million women give birth around the world each year. During pregnancy, changes in the immune system make women generally more susceptible to respiratory infections. And this year, pregnant women also have to worry about COVID-19, a virus that can affect a person’s lungs and airways. The U.K. government announced on Monday that pregnant women were at an increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus (COVID-19). Speaking at a press conference, Public Health England chief medical officer Chris Whitty said people in the “high risk” category should stay at home for 12 weeks. (That includes pe...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Londontime Source Type: news
More News: Coronavirus | COVID-19 | Emergency Medicine | International Medicine & Public Health | OBGYN | Pandemics | Pneumonia | Pregnancy | Reproduction Medicine | Respiratory Medicine | SARS