Skin tag removal: Optional but effective

Skin tags are common, benign skin growths that hang from the surface of the skin on a thin piece of tissue called a stalk. They are made up of many components, including fat, collagen fibers, and sometimes nerve cells and small blood vessels. It’s possible that these collagen fibers and blood vessels become wrapped up inside a layer of skin, leading to the formation of a skin tag. The medical term for a skin tag is acrochordon, and they can also be referred to as soft fibromas or fibroepithelial polyps. Skin tags are frequently found in areas of friction on the skin, such as the neck, underarms, under the breasts, eyelids, and other skin folds. They start as small, often flesh-colored bumps. They may stay that size and go largely unnoticed, enlarge and continue to be painless, or enlarge and become irritated due to friction or pressure. It’s not entirely clear what causes skin tags, and there are no proven ways to prevent them. Some studies have shown that skin tags are more common in people who have diabetes or are overweight. Pregnancy may also lead to increased numbers of skin tags, most likely due to hormonal changes in the body. Many methods are available for skin tag removal Skin tags do not have to be removed. They are not harmful, and will not become so over time. However, some people find them unsightly and choose to have to have them removed. Skin tag removal can be accomplished via a number of different methods. One commonly used method is cryother...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cosmetic surgery Health Skin and Hair Care Source Type: blogs

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Source: Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology - Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 31 May 2020Source: Mental Health and Physical ActivityAuthor(s): J.E. King, H. Jebeile, S.P. Garnett, L.A. Baur, S.J. Paxton, M.L. Gow
Source: Mental Health and Physical Activity - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: INI seem safe and effective in the prevention of MTCT. Our findings support their use as intensification regimens in pregnant women with high risk of MTCT. PMID: 32473739 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Medicina Clinica - Category: General Medicine Tags: Med Clin (Barc) Source Type: research
Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) is a birth injury that can cause severe functional loss in the affected limb. The purpose of this study was to determine the temporal changes in the national incidence of this condition and whether associated risk factors have changed over time. Children born via vaginal delivery were identified in the Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID) from 1997 to 2012, and those with NBPP were identified. The trend in incidence and risk factors were assessed through the study period. The nationwide incidence of NBPP decreased during the study period. Infants with shoulder dystocia, fetal macrosomi...
Source: Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics B - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Upper Limb Source Type: research
The objective of this study is to provide an overview of the available hypotheses on the aetiology of Blount’s disease since its first description and assessment of the available level of evidence, the quality of evidence and the occurrence of bias supporting these individual hypotheses. A systematic search according to the PRISMA statement was conducted using PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library using a broad combination of terminology to ascertain a complete selection. Proper MESH search criteria were formulated and the bibliographic search was limited to English and Dutch language articles. Articles wi...
Source: Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics B - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Leg & Foot Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 June 2020Source: Pregnancy HypertensionAuthor(s): Wenbo Zhou, Guangtong She, Kaiyan Yang, Bin Zhang, Jingbing Liu, Bin Yu
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 June 2020Source: Pregnancy HypertensionAuthor(s): Osasumwen Asemota, Lennox Bryson, Joshua Fogel
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 31 May 2020Source: Pregnancy HypertensionAuthor(s): Joshua I. Rosenbloom, Dustin Stwalley, Kathryn J. Lindley, D. Michael Nelson, Margaret A. Olsen, Molly J. Stout
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 31 May 2020Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North AmericaAuthor(s): Sydney M. Thayer, Jamie O. Lo, Aaron B. Caughey
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 31 May 2020Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North AmericaAuthor(s): Haywood L. Brown
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
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