What We Can Learn About Coronavirus from Images of SARS and MERS?

A  paperrecently published in theAmerican Journal of Roentgenologyhas found that scans of patients with COVID-19 share many similarities with imaging studies of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the  pandemichas so far (as of the date of this article) resulted in over 191,000 cases and more than 7,800 deaths. Although most of those infected only have cold-like symptoms, about 16 percent are serious cases where patients suffer from pneumonia and breathing difficulties. Coronavirusesare responsible for both the 2003 SARS pandemic in Guangdong Province, China and MERS, which was first diagnosed in 2012 in Saudi Arabia. Both viruses cause rapid-developing pneumonia and have many similar imaging features. The study authors note that radiographs of MERS and SARS patients are abnormal for around 80 percent of patients. They also found that for both viruses, peripheral multifocal airspace opacities on radiography and CT were commonly noted. Yet, there are a number of differences between the two viruses: SARS typically demonstrates unilateral disease with peripheral distribution, whereas MERS showed bilateral confluent diffuse airspace opacities, akin to symptoms of acute respiratory syndrome. When it comes to COVID-19, radiology researchers are seeing overlapping signs with previous coronaviruses. These similarities include patchy or diffuse asymmetric airspa...
Source: radRounds - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: blogs

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This study showed that a five-day regimen is as effective as 10 days–that’s important, doctors say, since it could mean shorter stays in the hospital, which could alleviate some of the burden on the health care system. “Of course we will have to wait for the final review of all the data, but it would be very nice to have an anti-viral that’s efficacious in this terrible illness,” says Dr. Aruna Subramanian, a clinical professor of medicine at Stanford and an investigator on the study. “At least we know that we can help patients with this, and that’s really the bottom line.” T...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 32438473 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: European Journal of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Eur J Immunol Source Type: research
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
Abstract The first report of the unusual manifestation of pneumonia-like symptoms in Wuhan City, China was made on 31 December 2019. Within one week, the Chinese authorities reported that they had identified the causative agent as a new member of the Coronavirus family, the same family of that was responsible for MERS and SARS not so many years ago. The new virus was called Novel Coronavirus 2019 (2019-nCoV). Three weeks later, the World Health Organization declared that 2019-nCoV was capable of direct human-to-human transmission, the virus had spread across several countries in three continents, and had infected ...
Source: Bioinformation - Category: Bioinformatics Authors: Tags: Bioinformation Source Type: research
Conclusions: First-level treatments include repurposing antivirals and antimalarials, and plasma infusion should help, but development of existing or new molecules into vaccines will take time. The unpredictable trajectory of this outbreak demands careful surveillance to monitor the situation, draw strategies, implement control measures, and create proper ethical laws and medical guidelines. PMID: 32412918 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Altern Ther Health Med Source Type: research
In this study, we have highlighted the key cytokines induced by coronavirus infections. We have demonstrated that genes coding interleukins (Il-1α, Il-1β, Il-6, Il-10), chemokine (Ccl2, Ccl3, Ccl5, Ccl10), and interferon (Ifn-α2, Ifn-β1, Ifn2) upsurge significantly which in line with the elevated infiltration of T cells, NK cells and monocytes in SARS-Cov treated group at 24 hours. Also, interleukins (IL-6, IL-23α, IL-10, IL-7, IL-1α, IL-1β) and interferon (IFN-α2, IFN2, IFN-γ) have increased dramatically in MERS-Cov at 24 hours. A similar cytokine profile showed the cytok...
Source: Aging - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Aging (Albany NY) Source Type: research
AbstractThe severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS ‐CoV‐2) pandemic has presented many challenges in healthcare, including obstetrics. Therefore, we read with great interest the special editorial published in the AOGS regarding clinical recommendations for the management of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) in pregnant women.1 As illustrated by the authors, the usefulness and safety of corticosteroids as an adjuvant therapy for COVID ‐19 pneumonia remains controversial. Corticosteroids may diminish the inflammatory response, a major factor for lung damage and acute respiratory distress syndrome in ...
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: LETTER TO EDITOR Source Type: research
Gilead, a California-based biopharmaceutical company, released two encouraging reports about remdesivir, an experimental drug that is being tested as a COVID-19 treatment. In one statement, the company said that a large study of remdesivir “met its primary endpoint”: meaning, in this case, that the researchers have concluded that hospitalized patients taking the drug appear to improve faster than patients given a placebo. The study is run by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health and involves severe patients at multiple centers across th...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Abstract Coronaviruses (CoVs) possess an enveloped, single, positive-stranded RNA genome which encodes for four membrane proteins, namely spike (S), envelope (E), membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins 3-5 [1]. With regard to pathogenicity, S proteins are essential for viral entry into host cells [2, 3]. SARS-CoV binds to the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)2 which is present on nonimmune cells, such as respiratory and intestinal epithelial cells, endothelial cells, kidney cells (renal tubules) and cerebral neurons and immune cells, such as alveolar monocytes/macrophages [4-6]. Of note, CD209L or liver/lymp...
Source: Endocrine, Metabolic and Immune Disorders Drug Targets - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Endocr Metab Immune Disord Drug Targets Source Type: research
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