The Elephant and the Virus

With respect to the coronavirus pandemic, I am concerned about India. Given their population density and more than 1.3 billion residents, the virus situation there could soon make what’s happening in Italy and Spain look tame. Earlier this week India was reporting only 129 infections and 2 deaths. Today it’s at 249 cases and 5 deaths. While those numbers may seem ridiculously low relative to India’s population, they appear to be starting out much the same as any other country. While mathematical illiterates might dismiss these numbers as trivial, fortunately India’s Prime Minister and their National Security Council are paying serious attention to what’s happening elsewhere. Consequently, India has been on lockdown since March 18 and plans to continue through March 31. I think they’ll need significantly longer, but it’s good to see them taking this step. India’s director of the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics, and Policy, Dr. Ramanan Laxminarayan, warns that India may have to deal with a tsunami of about 300 million coronavirus cases. He estimates that India has 70K-100K ICU beds in the entire country. Note that the total ICU beds in the USA are also estimated to be in this same range, and the USA is already on a path to overflow these beds in the weeks ahead but with a billion fewer people. One of my concerns is that India may be severely under-testing. So I’d pay a lot more attention to the death count...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

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After living through the past 2-3 months at home, remote care feels just like remote work does: a no-brainer. It is quite frustrating that a global crisis had to lead to this point. Just like in the case of (especially higher) education, people now start to realize how to leverage the tools that have already been there for a while. Once considered science fiction, remote care is today’s new standard. Let me show you how. There are many good examples of remote care solutions. It can connect patients and doctors without the need to travel (did you know that in Alaska patient records can only be transported on a sled...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence Digital Health Research E-Patients Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy Medical Education Telemedicine & Smartphones mobile app mobile health digital technology digital health strategy covid covid19 remote Source Type: blogs
During our stay-at-home mandates, virtual meetings have become the go-to for continuing necessary and meaningful relationships, and perhaps even to get a little self-care. In fact, some of us may find ourselves overbooked with digital appointments, be it Zoom board-game battles or FaceTime catch-up sessions — sometimes, with people we barely had any pre-pandemic contact with.  Although today it seems as common as oxygen, these technologies and devices are not available to all of us, namely those in lower income households. Those of us who have the luxury of this access are incredibly lucky. We are able to connec...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Industrial and Workplace Relationships coronavirus COVID-19 social distancing Social Isolation Source Type: blogs
Convalescent plasma for the treatment of infectious diseases has been used since the early 20th century and was associated with reduced mortality during the 1918 influenza, 2003 SARS, and 2009 influenza H1N1 pandemics. However, most published studies of these diseases were case series and retrospective comparisons of treated and nontreated individuals. Consistent with this, several uncontrolled case series of convalescent plasma use in patients with coronavirus disease (2019) COVID-19 have suggested a possible benefit. Given encouraging historical precedents and the absence of proven SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory di...
Source: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic poses the most significant modern-day public health challenge since the Spanish flu of 1918, causing substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide.1 Coronavirus disease 2019 predominantly affects the respiratory system, causing severe pneumonia and respiratory distress syndrome. There is also involvement of multiple organs, and the cardiovascular system has been implicated. In a recent study to investigate characteristics and prognostic factors in 339 elderly patients with COVID-19, Wang and colleagues observed a high proportion of severe and critical cases as well as high fatality rates.
Source: Journal of Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
US sends Brazil 2m doses of hydroxychloroquine, despite safety fears;pressure builds on South African president. This blog is now closed please follow our continuing live coverage belowCoronavirus live coverage12.37amBSTWe are closing this blog now but you can stay up to date on all of our live coverage of the coronavirus pandemic at our new global blog below.https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2020/jun/01/coronavirus-live-news-brazil-passes-500000-covid-19-cases-as-india-extends-lockdown-in-high-risk-zones12.10amBSTThat ’s all from me,Clea Skopeliti, for today. Many thanks to everyone who wrote in. I ’m han...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news US news UK news Australia news Science Infectious diseases Brazil Russia China Americas Asia Pacific Medical research Europe Microbiology Africa Middle East and North Africa Source Type: news
Brazil becomes fourth worst country for deaths;Spanish prime minister to seek two-week extension of state of emergency;Pressure builds on South African presidentGlobal report: cases pass 6 million as Donald Trump postpones G7Senior UK adviser has broken trust in policy, say top scientistsUK coronavirus updates - liveCoronavirus latest: at a glance11.50amBSTAngela GiuffridaThe Italian ‘orange vest’ movement held several protests across Italy on Saturday, including in Milan and Bergamo, two cities in the epicentre of Italy’s coronavirus pandemic, demanding a new government and return to the Italian Lira whi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news US news UK news Australia news Science Infectious diseases Brazil Russia China Americas Asia Pacific Medical research Europe Microbiology Africa Middle East and North Africa Source Type: news
A distant chapter in U.S. history has acquired new interest this year, as the coronavirus outbreak forces the country to look back at the Spanish flu pandemic, just over a century ago. Elizabeth Palmer looks at what's done differently today, and the many things that have stayed the same.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
When Eric Freeland, 34, started coughing at the end of March, he didn’t think much of it. But when his symptoms grew worse, Freeland’s mother began to worry. Freeland is a Native American living with his family in the Navajo Nation in the southwestern U.S., where access to healthcare is limited. He is also diabetic, putting him at greater risk to the coronavirus. When Freeland’s breathing became short and stuttered, his mother drove him to the nearest hospital where within minutes of arriving, he lost consciousness. He awoke three weeks later, hooked up to a ventilator, from a medically induced coma. &l...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news
It ’s abundantly clear that the COVID-19 pandemic has not hit all people equally, and part of that disparity is informational. Many communities have an increased vulnerability because of a lack access to official news, public health information and safety recommendations in a language other than Engl ish.To help remedy that, faculty from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and the Asian American Studies Center quickly came together recently to launchTranslateCovid.org. This new website presents health and safety recommendations and other information in more than 40 languages, including Spanish, Chinese, Korean,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
An experimental procedure that transfers blood plasma from a coronavirus survivor into the bloodstream of a patient still battling the disease is among the most promising treatments amid the pandemic. Its creation is credited to one man, Charles Drew. Drew was inspired to go into medicine after the devastating Spanish Flu pandemic took the life of his sister. Michelle Miller looks at Drew's life and accomplishments, and speaks to his daughter, Charlene Drew Jarvis, about his legacy.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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