Coronavirus and Politicians vs. the Economy

Chris EdwardsThe American economy is closing down rapidly from both voluntary and mandatory business closings. It is not just restaurants, but also manufacturing, construction, recreation, travel, and many other industries that are shuttering operations.If this continues, there will be a  massive plunge in incomes, and tens of millions of people will not be able to meet basic expenses such as rent and food. Policymakers are acting quickly to slow the virus spread, but I fear they are shuttering too much of the economy because we face a months‐​long health crisis, not a weeks ‐​long crisis. The government does not have enough money to keep the economy afloatuntil a  vaccine arrives, maybe a  year from now.To get a  sense of the massive economic shrinkage possible, the data belowfrom BLS shows U.S. employment data in private ‐​sector industries. I left out the nation’s 23 million government workers because they will likely continue to be paid.The nation ’s 130 million private‐​sector workers would have generated $16 trillion of income this year (Table 6.1D). With massive business closings, how much of that will be lost? The health part of the largest sector, health care and education, will of course remain open during the crisis. But other large sectors —such as leisure and hospitality, retail, manufacturing, and construction—are mainly closing down.Consider a  scenario where half of private‐...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs

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The genesis and global spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in significant health concerns amid societies that were ill-equipped for such a formidable opponent. The COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated systemic health disparities and wea...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news
For most Americans, 2020 has already been a rough year — and it’s not even half over. A pandemic, natural disasters, economic decline, and, for many, the loss of a job have taken a toll on their mental health. “Stress is particularly acute when you’re experiencing a situation that is outside of your control,” says Dr. Kerry Ressler, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. “You may feel stuck, frozen, or helpless.” After a traumatic period, even when things settle down, it can be difficult to move on and regain a sense of normalcy. Reducing stress and regaining your footi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Coronavirus and COVID-19 Mental Health Stress Source Type: blogs
The objectives of this article are to describe the reorganization of the three levels of psychiatric care for inmates in France in the context of Covid-19 pandemic and to have a look at the impact of lockdown measures and early releases on mental health of prisoners. METHODS: This work is based on a survey conducted in April 2020 in France among psychiatric healthcare providers working in 42 ambulatory units for inmates and in the 9 full-time inpatient psychiatric wards exclusively for inmates called "UHSAs" (which stands for "unités hospitalières spécialement aménagées...
Source: L Encephale - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Encephale Source Type: research
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Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
What are you teaching your kids? Being at home with your children under one roof can be challenging, but amidst a pandemic with the added strain can be really stressful! How can you use this time to connect more authentically at home with your children in quarantine? Here are 8 ways to slow down and connect with your kids at home. 1. Slow Down. You’re probably feeling frustrated with reactionary emotions to a difficult situation. Slowing down and getting real with your emotions shows your kids how to be resilient. The first step is making a distinction between worry and concern. Sharing your authentic emotions from ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Children and Teens Family Parenting Publishers YourTango coronavirus COVID-19 kids Parents trust Source Type: blogs
What do Sciencebase readers make of the view that there will far more long-term excess deaths and misery caused by the global lockdowns than there would have been had we let this coronavirus run free? This question is about estimating the serious long-term effects rather than giving those covidiots who fancy a trip to the beach or Barnard Castle an excuse to run wild and party. It is being discussed widely by many lockdown skeptics, including very well-respected scientists such as Mark Changizi. Obviously allowing the virus to run free would have meant overwhelming our healthcare services and there’d have been many m...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
One of my readers recently asked: How do you stay connected to loved ones who aren’t on a journey of curiosity and growth? I’ll frame this more generally by addressing these question too: How do you maintain relationships with incompatible people who expect you to stay connected?How do you manage shifting relationships while on a journey of growth?How do you deal with feelings of guilt arising from letting go of incompatible people? To answer the first question, my answer is pretty simple. I really don’t. If they reach out to me, I’ll be civil with them, but I don’t see the point o...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Emotions Relationships Values Source Type: blogs
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Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy coronavirus COVID-19 Source Type: blogs
Organizations must act to protect the health and well-being of health care workers on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic —now and in the future, wrote the leaders of the National Academy of Medicine Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience in anarticle inThe New England Journal of Medicine.“Before the virus struck, the U.S. clinical workforce was already experiencing a crisis of burnout. We are now facing a surge of physical and emotional harm that amounts to a parallel pandemic,” wrote Victor J. Dzau, M.D., Darrell Kirch, M.D., and Thomas Nasca, M.D. “Tragically, we are alr...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: chief wellness officers COVID-19 Darrell Kirch epidemiological tracking program health care workers New England Journal of Medicine reporting systems Thomas Nasca Victor J. Dzau Well-Being Source Type: research
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