Evaluation of glycoprotein E subunit and live attenuated varicella ‐zoster virus vaccines formulated with a single‐strand RNA‐based adjuvant

ConclusionsTaken together, these results highlight that the gE subunit vaccine and LAV developed in this study can be functional VZV vaccines, and ssRNAs appear to function better as adjuvants in a subunit vaccine than in an LAV.
Source: Immunity, Inflammation and Disease - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research

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Adults re-exposed to the herpes zoster virus found to be around 30% less likely to develop shingles Related items fromOnMedica GPs are dealing with growing flu rates Experts predict 'invigorated' winter flu Illness poorly managed in those with learning disability Flu activity appears to be nearing its peak Doctors can help overcome ‘vaccine hesitancy’
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: LZV and RZV are effective in preventing herpes zoster disease for up to three years (the main studies did not follow participants for more than three years). To date, there are no data to recommend revaccination after receiving the basic schedule for each type of vaccine. Both vaccines produce systemic and injection site adverse events of mild to moderate intensity. PMID: 31696946 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
UK Abstract In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) primary varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections (chickenpox) or reactivation (shingles, herpes zoster) pose a particular challenge for neurologists and physicians in everyday clinical practice. On the one hand the various immunotherapeutic agents for treatment of MS have differently expressed risks for VZV-associated infections and on the other hand the currently available vaccination strategies (dead vs. live vaccines, single vs. combination vaccines) require an individualized approach. Moreover, in addition to the optimal timing of vaccination during the...
Source: Der Nervenarzt - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Nervenarzt Source Type: research
Abstract Herpes zoster (HZ), also known as shingles, results from reactivation of the latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV), which commonly causes chickenpox in childhood. Greater than 90% of adults are infected with this virus, putting them at risk for reactivation. HZ presents as a painful, vesicular rash distributed in a unilateral and dermatomal pattern along dorsal root or cranial nerve ganglia. The rash often presents with prodromal symptoms and progresses to include clear vesicular clusters, evolving through stages of pustulation, ulceration, and crusting. HZ therapy currently involves the use of antiviral ag...
Source: Skin Therapy Letter - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Skin Therapy Lett Source Type: research
Shingles is caused by the varicella-zoster virus -- the same virus that causes chickenpox. If you've had chickenpox, the virus can lie dormant in your body's nerve tissue for years when suddenly it's triggered by stress or a weakened immune system, and manifests as shingles. A new shingles vaccine called Shingrix is recommended for anyone [...]
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news
Christine I. Alston1,2 and Richard D. Dix1,2* 1Department of Biology, Viral Immunology Center, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, United States 2Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins provide selective negative feedback to prevent pathogeneses caused by overstimulation of the immune system. Of the eight known SOCS proteins, SOCS1 and SOCS3 are the best studied, and systemic deletion of either gene causes early lethality in mice. Many viruses, including herpesviruses such as herpes simplex virus and cytomega...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
hon Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a pathogenic human herpes virus that causes varicella (chickenpox) as a primary infection, following which it becomes latent in peripheral ganglia. Decades later, the virus may reactivate either spontaneously or after a number of triggering factors to cause herpes zoster (shingles). Varicella and its complications are more severe in the immunosuppressed. The most frequent and important complication of VZV reactivation is postherpetic neuralgia, the cause of which is unknown and for which treatment is usually ineffective. Reactivation of VZV may also cause a wide variety of neurologic...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Shingles: Vaccination can lower your risk? Shingles is a viral infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus ? the same virus that causes chickenpox. After you've had chickenpox, the virus remains inactive in nerve tissue near your spinal cord and brain. Years later, the virus may reactivate as shingles, causing a painful skin rash along nerve [...]
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Perhaps you heard the news recently that Lin-Manuel Miranda has shingles. Headlines announced this in a variety of ways: Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda is suffering from shingles (NY DailyNews) Lin-Manuel Miranda has shingles; must be quarantined from his baby (today.com) Lin-Manuel Miranda has shingles, regrets joke about blurred vision (CBS News). Without more information, these headlines might leave you wondering: is this a serious condition? Is it dangerous for children? Can it lead to blindness? What is shingles? The term “shingles” refers to a painful rash caused ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Skin and Hair Care Vaccines Source Type: blogs
(Natural News) A case study published in the journal Pediatric Dermatology looked at shingles cases that occurred in healthy children that were vaccinated for chickenpox. In the study, the authors looked at cases of shingles that were initially thought to be skin rashes. The authors looked at seven cases of children who contracted herpes zoster (shingles) at the...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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